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Deepa Iyer, Moustafa Bayoumi, and Amardeep Singh

Presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program in the NYU Department of Social & Cultural Analysis. Cosponsored by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU.

“We do not yet understand or appreciate the profound ways that the war on terror has created a political ecology of its own, one that relies on excessive secrecy, differential rights, innovative forms of racism, expanded executive power, and permanent war, while also threatening to undermine our bedrock principles of equality and privacy, so enthralled have we become with fighting terrorism and expanding militarism.” [Bayoumi]

“The bodies and lives of South Asian, Arab, Muslim, and Sikh communities, along with Latino, Asian, and multiracial youth are already becoming sites where new battles of racism and xenophobia are waged. They are simultaneously perceived as the targets of racial anxiety – as well as potential members of the expanding category of ‘Whiteness'” [Iyer]

Join Moustafa Bayoumi and Deepa Iyer to mark the publication of their important new books about the frontlines of post-9/11 America and for a wide-ranging conversation with leading activist Amardeep Singh. Books will be available for sale and signing

Moustafa Bayoumi, professor of English at Brooklyn College (CUNY), is the author/editor of four books, including How Does It Feel To Be A Problem? Being Young and Arab in America, which won an American Book Award and the Arab American Book Award for Nonfiction. His latest book is This Muslim American Life: Dispatches From The War on Terror.

Deepa Iyer is senior fellow at The Center for Social Inclusion and the author of We Too Sing America: South Asian, Arab, Muslim and Sikh Immigrants Shape Our Multiracial Future. She was Activist-in-Residence at the University of Maryland’s Asian American studies program and the Executive Director of South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT) for nearly a a decade.

Amardeep Singh is the program officer for the National Security and Human Rights Campaign, which supports US-based organizations working to promote national security policies that respect human rights, civil liberties, and the rule of law. Prior to joining Open Society, he spent eleven years at the Sikh Coalition, an organization that he cofounded and which is the largest Sikh civil rights organization in the country.

Organizer: Asian/Pacific/American Studies Program in the Department of Social & Cultural Analysis
Venue: 244 Greene Street, First floor
Address:
New York, NY United States
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