Category Archives: Announcement

Call for Papers: SYMPOSIUM “Writing and Picturing in Post-1945 Asian Art”

Call for Papers
SYMPOSIUM “Writing and Picturing in Post-1945 Asian Art”
(Part II: Graduate Student Workshops)

Center for the Art of East Asia, Center for East Asian Studies (University of Chicago), and PoNJA-GenKon are organizing a three-day international symposium Writing and Picturing in Post-1945 Asian Art to take place in April 2017. The second day of the symposium will include graduate student workshops to focus on the latest scholarship emerging from research done by graduate students and recent graduates in the field. We would like unpublished materials that will point to new directions of research and interpretation.

Symposium Summary
Dates: April 21–23, 2017
Place: Department of Art History, University of Chicago
Co-organized by Center for the Art of East Asia, Center for East Asian Studies, and PoNJA-GenKon

This symposium begins with the examination of two basic human activities, writing and picturing. In different cultures, these two have had historically varying relationships. To name just one, in East Asia, the two (書 and画) have traditionally been entwined, with ink and brush playing central roles. In postwar art, traditional and culturally specific modes of writing and picturing began to undergo transformation, inspired, facilitated, and accelerated in part by increased transnational exchange. In view of developments over the past half century, the symposium Writing and Picturing will survey the state of scholarship and discuss future directions in museological and art-historical studies. The symposium organizers aspire to form a bridge between the established field of modernist art history and newly evolving contemporary art while casting a wider geographical net beyond East Asia. By providing a platform for the presentation of new research on various practices that merge writing and picturing in postwar and contemporary art, we aim to create a watershed for the culturally dynamic rethinking of these fundamental human acts. For the full concept statement and questions, please contact mailponja@gmail.com.

Eligibility for Submission
Students currently enrolled in graduate-level institutions anywhere in the world and recent PhDs who have received their degrees from such institutions in the past two years are eligible to submit paper proposals.

General Parameters
Within the scope of the symposium, proposed papers should be based on original and critical research within the following parameters:

1) the paper must address the work of art and related media in visual culture (e.g. film, design, architecture, manga, etc.) produced after 1945
2) the artist(s) must have been either born in Asia, of Asian descent, or active in Asia
3) the work must demonstrably relate to aesthetic or socio-political situations in Asia after 1945.
4) the paper may address much broader genres of expression than calligraphy, such as ceramic and textile art, as long as it presents a unique approach to the issue of tradition and modernity.
5) You are welcome to submit more than one proposal. However, you will have only one selected paper to present during the program.

Please send:

1) your proposal, no more than 500 words
2) your CV, no more than 2 pages
3) if you want to attach image(s), no more than 1MB (please scale down the files)

Send to: mailponja@gmail.com
Due: August 15, Monday, 2016

Funding

Please direct any question to mailponja@gmail.com.

Selection Committee
Co-Chairs: Reiko Tomii, Miwako Tezuka, Chelsea Foxwell
Committee members: Joan Kee, David Raskin

About PoNJA-GenKon
PoNJA-GenKon is an acronym for “Post Nineteen-forty-five Japanese Art / Gendai Bijutsu Kondankai,” an online discussion group of students, art professionals, artists, and individuals interested in contemporary Japanese art across the globe. It was founded in 2003 by two scholars, Dr. Reiko Tomii and Dr. Miwako Tezuka. Also known in its short form, PoNJA, the group fosters communication among the members, shares knowledge with the public, and helps develop this area of study. Today, it has grown to include more than 120 members globally, including all the key leaders and innovators of this still-young field. So much so, “ponja” as a terminology has also come to signify the field of postwar and contemporary Japanese art history.

Miwako Tezuka's photo.
Lead Image: Enrico Isamu Oyama (b.1983), Improvised Mural (Walls), detail, 2015. Acrylic-­‐based aerosol, acrylic paint and sumi ink on walls. (H) 3.8 m x (L) 69.5 m (overall). Installation at Tringle Space, Chelsea College of Arts, University of the Arts, London, United Kingdom. Photo by Tom Carter

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POSITION AVAILABLE AT THE KOREAN AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM – IMMEDIATE OPENING

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POSITION AVAILABLE AT THE KOREAN AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM – IMMEDIATE OPENING

The Korean American National Museum’s mission is to preserve and interpret the history, experiences, culture and achievements of Americans of Korean ancestry. In accomplishing its mission, the Museum works to become a center for cultural exchange, arts, and education, a catalyst for sharing ideas and resources, and a center for promoting and celebrating the diversity of culture in this country. It is important to the Museum’s mission to help make the Korean American experience vivid and intelligible to other communities and to encourage these groups to find out more about Korean Americans in Los Angeles and elsewhere.

One of the Museum’s primary objectives is to introduce audiences to the sources of Korean culture, enabling younger members of the Korean American community and its neighbors from other ethnic communities to gain a greater understanding of this rich and complex civilization, a civilization that in Los Angeles, which has the country’s largest Korean American population, has not had a consistent venue for its contemporary and traditional works of art and for a creative recounting of its history. The Korean American Museum provides an appropriate setting in Los Angeles to exhibit and focus the public’s attention on this often overlooked culture, history, and art.

 

JOB DESCRIPTION

The Executive Director is responsible for the successful leadership and management of the organization according to the strategic direction set by the Board of Directors.

 

QUALIFICATIONS

The Korean American National Museum seeks a candidate with leadership and/or management experience in a professional environment. This candidate should also be able work independently on multiple projects at the same time, and be able to meet deadlines promptly. Experience in a non-profit organization is preferred.

– BA/BS in Museum Studies, Art, or Business Management (or related field/experience) required, MA/MS preferred.

– Knowledge of government funding and experience in grant writing

– Experience in fundraising

– Knowledge of financial management

– Knowledge of human resources management

– Knowledge of project management

– Excellent communication skills (written and spoken).

– Interest in Korean American culture is a must!

– Interest in Arts and Public Education.

– Interest in meeting people to seek and follow leads for the organization.

– Bilingual English/Korean preferred.

– Proficient in Microsoft Office, especially Word and Excel.

– Experience using Adobe Photoshop/Illustrator a plus, but not required.

If interested in applying to this position, please email your resume and cover letter no later than February 17, 2016 to: irene.kanmuseum@gmail.com Salary DOE.

The Korean American National Museum is a non-profit organization.

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Media as Singularities — Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai at NYU

“Media as Singularities”
Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai 
at NYU Einstein Auditorium, 34 Stuyvesant St, New York, NY 10003
Sun, March 6 at 4pm6pm.
map https://goo.gl/maps/Qmc8sz5kgZr

 
We begin with Masayuki Kawai and Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo) discussing Media as Singularities then a feedback performance by Kawai. Then, Zhen Zhang of NYU Tisch Cinema Studies and Tom Looser from East Asian Studies at NYU will join to talk about Kawai’s work.
It is open to public and free of charge.
Symposium/lecture:
USA: Tom Looser (NYU)

Zhen Zhang (NYU)
Japan: Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo)

Masayuki Kawai (video artist)
Inline image 1
Video Feedback Live Performance by Masayuki Kawai:
Masayuki Kawai builds a video feedback system composed of dozens of analog audio-visual devices. He shows the machine on site as an installation and operates it as live performance as well. Kawai’s “Video Feedback” works are made with an analog video feedback from a closed circuit system with free-flowing electronic data. No outer video/sound source is used; the video machines and circuits contain subtle noises that are amplified in the loop to generate infinite data flows. When these are put into the video input, they display various figure and colour mutations. When these are channeled into the audio input, they make sounds that are synchronized with the image. It is impossible to make these images and sounds by computer programing-simulation because the digital process eliminates the noise and gives privilege to the signals. Thus, through these works, we directly experience an organic creation of singularity with analog electronic video.

About Media as Singularities

Flush with emergencies, probabilities and preemptions, is the situation under control or out of control? Shock, noise, accident, event, etc., any such exceptional anomaly now seems to be captured by the networks to improve their flexible, robust and sustainable creativities of the self-controlling collective security against frightening unknowable aliens.
A conceptual observation of glitch, however, would provide another view; glitch, not as an error, but as a rhythm of recursive generation of a pattern, which is simultaneously singular and multiple. This paradoxical concept of glitch envisions the real and virtual power of a non-digital and in-formal logic as the potential of the technological environment. It is not simply a break cutting into a connection or opening a hole into a containment. It is not statistical digital uncertainty of unpredictable contingencies or the coming transcendental future. On the contrary, it is a sensation of immaterial materialities of the networks to metamorphose their process of auto-production. They are the conditions of the possibilities of the techno-political ecology. This rhythm is felt resonance of autonomous-and-heteronomous vibrations of the living singularities.
An ethico-aesthetic task of media as singularities is to construct a sensor for these living singularities, transducing them into the sensible as an existing alternative track: Media, the immanent future.

 

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DAAN-NY tour of Alternative Dimension

https://www.facebook.com/events/1673529579551782/

Please join this DAAN-NY regional event!

DAAN-NYEventpic

at 3 PM – 6 PM
Project:ARTspace
156 Fifth Avenue, Suite 308
New York, NY 10010

 

Are you an artist/curator/scholar of the Asian diaspora in NYC? want to connect with others in the Diasporic Asian Arts Network (DAAN)? Meet up with DAAN-NY at Project:ARTspace on February 28th from 3pm-6pm.

Michelle Yoh will give us a tour of Alternative Dimension, her most recent curation featuring the work of Lisa Corinne Davis and Maureen Hoon.

Here’s info on the show:
Alternative Dimension
Lisa Corinne Davis, Maureen Hoon
Curated by Michelle Y. Loh

We construct our imagination and identity, to a great extent, based on recorded images and predefined concepts, received labels and fictions that allow us to make quotidian sense of the world. Questioning our received labels and fictions provides an opening where we can access our imagination and identity anew. Coming from different generations, raised in different hemispheres, Lisa Corinne Davis and Maureen Hoon creates works that are different on the surface, yet both artists bend representations of the physical world to a similar purpose. Drawing references from the urban environment, their works allude to materiality, space, image, and affect, and provide access to new ways of seeing and understanding.

http://projectartspace.com/exhibition/alternative-dimensions/

If you want to become a DAAN member to include your profile on the DAAN listing or to sign up for emails, visit http://www.nyu-apastudies.org/research/DAAN/?page_id=5

 

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Diasporic Asian Art Network Panel Session: Asian Latino Art and Visual Cultures: Current Scholarship and Institutional Practices — at CAA 2015 in Washington DC

DAAN LOGO

 

Diasporic Asian Art Network Panel Session:
Saturday, February 6, 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel; Room: Washington 5, Exhibition Level

Asian Latino Art and Visual Cultures:
Current Scholarship and Institutional Practices

Panelists:

On Circles and Circuits: An exhibition on Chinese Caribbean Art at the Chinese American Museum
Alexandra Chang, chair
Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs, NYU A/P/A Institute

Chinese American Museum: From Localized Histories to Global Approaches
Steven Wong
Senior Curator, Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles

Building a Cultural Laboratory: the Smithsonian Asian-Latino Project and New Models of Cross-Cultural Exhibition and Education
Adriel Luis
Curator of Digital and Emerging Media, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center

Guest Editor of ADVA Journal Special Issue “Memory and Migration”
Anna Kazumi Stahl
Director, Global Program, NYU Buenos Aires

This panel on Asian Latino art and visual cultures will range from historic to contemporary art and present some current scholarship on mobilities of images, goods, people, and ideas on the envisioning of Asia in Latin America as well as art practice. The panel will also include current projects from community-based and national-based institutions, the Chinese American Museum in LA and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC and the Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas [ADVA] journal.

Special thanks to DAAN Panel Committee Chair Alice Ming Wai Jim and Committee Members ShiPu Wang, Leila Philip and Binod Shrestha

 

Bios

Alexandra Chang is Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs at the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University, where she is Project Director of the Virtual Asian American Museum and Co-Editor of the journal Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas (ADVA). She is the Director of the NYU Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange (GAX) and Co-Organizer of the East Coast Asian American Art Project (ECAAAP). She is also the co-organizer of the Diasporic Asian Art Network (DAAN) and serves on CAA’s International Committee. She was Managing Editor of Art Asia Pacific and is the author of Envisioning Diaspora: Asian American Visual Art Collectives from Godzilla, Godzookie, to the Barnstormers.

Adriel Luis is a self-taught musician, poet, curator, coder, and visual artist who believes imagination is key to transforming cultural paradigms. Adriel is currently based in Washington DC as the Curator of Digital and Emerging Media at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, where he is focused on exploring intersectional identities in the U.S. and contemporary Asian diasporic art. He is a founding member of the iLL-Literacy arts collective, and also produces and performs music independently. Adriel frequently travels to different parts of Asia with particular interest in how digital space shapes global communities, and how varying levels of freedom of expression channel artistic political imagination. Adriel can be found across online platforms as @DRZZL.

Anna Kazumi Stahl is a fiction writer and PhD working in literature and critical mixed race studies. Based in Argentina, Stahl is Director of NYU Buenos Aires. Serving on Fulbright and PEN/Argentina, she lectures at MALBA museum and assists in J.M. Coetzee’s UNSAM seminars on Literatures of the Southern Hemisphere.

Steven Wong is the Senior Curator at the Chinese American Museum based in Los Angeles.  Mr. Wong is an artist, contemporary art curator and the curator of history at the museum.  His academic interests include Chinese transnational labor migration from the 1850-1930, the role of Orientalism in the construction of Chinatowns and tourist economies, the post-1965 Chinese American middle-class in the United states and the formation of ethnoburbs.  In 2012, he co-curated an exhibition for the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980  titled Breaking Ground: Chinese American Architects in Los Angeles at CAM which was the first comprehensive exhibit about a group of pioneering Chinese American architects whose designs continue to influence the landscape of Southern California.  He recently co-curated Origins: The Birth and Rise of Chinese American Communities in Los Angeles which is the largest permanent exhibition on the West Coast about the settlement of Chinese immigrants in Southern California from the 19th Century to the present day.  Furthermore, he curated a contemporary art exhibition titled (de)Constructing Chinatown which opened the door to local artists to re-imagine one of the oldest communities in Los Angeles through multimedia forms.  Mr. Wong holds a Masters in Asian American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (1998) and a Master in Fine Arts from the University of California (2000).

 

apa_identity_vertical_blackThe Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU is the institutional sponsor of DAAN

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The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) — awards 2016

2016 WCA Award Recipients

http://www.nationalwca.org/


L to R: Tomie Arai, Helène Aylon, Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, Juana Guzman and Stephanie Sherman.

The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) is pleased to announce the recipients for the 2016 WCA Lifetime Achievement Awards: Tomie Arai, Helène Aylon, Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, andJuana Guzman. The recipient for the 2016 President’s Art & Activism Award is Stephanie Sherman.
 
The awards will be held at the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) on Thursday February 4, 2016 in Washington D.C. The event will include a walk around reception with open bar and viewing of the 3rd floor collection from 5:30-7:30pm (ticketed), the ceremony, 7:30-9:00pm (free and open to the public). Join us for the celebration!

Purchase Tickets Here

Download the Press Release

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Asian Women Giving Circle Request for Proposals 2016

Asian Women Giving Circle
Request for Proposals 2016
Women, Arts & Progressive Social Change
Deadline to Apply: Friday, March 11, 2016, 5 pm EST
Asian Women Giving Circle (AWGC) believes culture is an essential part of any strategy for social change. We support Asian American women-led organizations and individual artists in NYC who are using arts and culture to:
  • bring about progressive social transformation,
  • raise awareness and catalyze action around critical issues that affect Asian American women, girls and families, and
  • highlight and promote women’s central role as leaders, creators, developers and managers of these projects.
In this 2016 grants cycle, we anticipate that 5-8 project grants will be awarded, contingent on available funding. The maximum grant amount is $15,000.

Grantee Update

The Franklin Furnace Fund and Asian Women Giving Circle are pleased to present FIREWALL, a pop-up Internet Café and participatory art installation in New York City by Joyce Yu-Jean Lee, on view from Tuesday, February 9through Sunday, March 6, 2016 at 16B Orchard Street, New York City 10002. To learn more about the 2015 funded project, go here.
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About AWGC
Founded in 2005, the AWGC is a collaboration of Asian American women in New York City who are passionate about amplifying the transformative power of arts and culture to achieve progressive change. We promote grassroots philanthropy and pool our resources to fund projects led by Asian American women who use their creativity to move hearts and minds and inspire communities to be free of fear, bias and injustice in every form.
Like us on Facebook
Fiscally sponsored by the Ms. Foundation for Women, AWGC is a member of the Asian Americans/ Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy and the National Giving Circle Network.
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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World book launch and panel at Queens Museum of Art

http://www.queensmuseum.org/events/zhang-hongtu-expanding-visions-of-a-shrinking-world

ZH

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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World
Book Launch and Panel Discussion

Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World is edited  by Luchia Meihua Lee, guest curator of Zhang Hongtu, and Jerome Silbergeld. Twelve leading art experts, art historians, and critics have reviewed the life, career, and artistic development of New York based Chinese artist Zhang Hongtu. Please join us for a conversation about the book and exhibition with Jerome Silbergeld and contributors Eugenie Tsai and Lilly Wei.

A pioneer in contemporary Chinese art, Zhang created the first example of “China Pop” art, and his oeuvre is as diverse, intellectually complex, and engaging as it is entertaining. From painting and sculpture to computer generated works and multimedia projects, Zhang’s art is equally rich in terms of China’s history and its current events, containing profound reflections on China’s oldest cultural habits and contemporary preoccupations. He provides a model of cross-cultural interaction designed to make Asian and Western audiences look more closely at each other and at themselves to recognize the beliefs they hold and the unexamined values they adhere to.

From his early work in China during the Cultural Revolution to his decades as an artist in New York, Zhang reflects the complex attitudes of a scholar-artist toward modernity, as well as toward Asian and Western societies and himself.  Placing Zhang in the context of his cultural milieu both in China and in the Chinese immigrant artist community in America, this volume’s contributors examine his adaptations of classic art to reflect a contemporary sensibility, his relation to Cubism and Social Realism, his collaboration with the celebrated fashion designer Vivienne Tam, and his visual critique of China’s current environmental crisis.

Jerome Silbergeld is the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History at Princeton University and director of Princeton’s Tang Center for East Asian Art. A specialist in Song-Yuan period painting, he has published more than eighty books, catalogues, articles, and book chapters on topics in traditional and contemporary Chinese painting, traditional architecture and gardens, cinema and photography. He has also curated and co-curated eight exhibitions, including the first major solo exhibition in America by a Chinese artist, in 1988. His books on cinema and photography include China Into Film, Hitchcock with a Chinese Face, and Humanism in China. On contemporary art, his books includeContradictions: Artistic Life, the Socialist State, and the Chinese Painter Li Huasheng, the first extensive study of any PRC artist, which became a New York Times notable book of the year in 1993; Outside In, on the globalization and loss of “Chineseness” of Chinese art; and ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art.

Eugenie Tsai has been John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum since 2007. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P.S.1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University

Lilly Wei is a New York-based independent curator and critic whose focus is global contemporary art. She has written regularly for Art in America since 1984 and is a contributing editor at ARTnews and  formerly one at Art Asia Pacific.  Among other national and international publications, Wei has also written for Art & Australia, Asian Art News, Sanat Dünyamiz, Art Papers, Sculpture Magazine, Studio International, Tema Celeste, Flash Art, Art Press, and Art and Auction, and has frequently reported on international biennials such as those of Venice, Sydney, Cairo, Athens, Reykjavik, Shenzhen and Hong Kong and international exhibitions such as Documenta and Sonsbeek, the sculpture international in the Netherlands.  She has been the author of many exhibition catalogues and brochures on contemporary art, including publications for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Knoedler, Marlborough and Pace Galleries, New York, NY. She has curated numerous exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Asia. Two of her most recent exhibitions were “The Museum Imagined” at Danese/Corey, New York, NY, and “Uncanny/Figure” at Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs.  Wei lectures on critical and curatorial practices and serves on numerous advisory committees and review panels.  She was born in Chengdu, China and has an MA in art history from Columbia University, New York.

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IN-HYUNG KIM: The Paris Years, at Art Projects International, NYC

Art Projects International


IN-HYUNG KIM: The Paris Years
January 28 – February 27, 2016

Art Projects International
434 Greenwich Street, Ground Floor, New York City 10013

Là, tout n’est qu’ordre et beauté,
Luxe, calme et volupté.

Art Projects International is pleased to announce In-Hyung Kim: The Paris Years from January 28 to February 27, 2016. The exhibition features selected works from the artist’s years in Paris and includes paintings and works on paper. In-Hyung Kim moved to Paris in 1978 at the age of 20. She graduated from L’École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts and lived and worked in Paris as an artist for nearly 30 years before returning to Seoul, where she now lives and works.

The paintings in The Paris Years range from boldly and sensitively rendered, expressionistic, multi-media works on paper to more atmospheric works on canvas. The paintings on canvas read as nocturnes, with floral elements appearing out of darknesses red, black or green. The works suggest the melancholic romanticism of Baudelaire but introduce an aesthetic wholly derived from In-Hyung Kim’s uncompromising sensibility. Her carefully cultivated personal aesthetic and gifts for painting are readily apparent; in Untitled #27 of 1994, a freely brushed, scumbled, white, tree-like form could be a baobab in space or the last mushroom cloud. From afar, an untitled work of 2000 appears as slashes of orange crimson against black—up close it is a gorgeous representation of untethered blooms in a night garden.

For more information please contact Art Projects: 212-343-2599 or api@artprojects.com


Art Projects International
434 Greenwich Street, Ground Floor
New York, NY 10013212.343.2599
api@artprojects.com
www.artprojects.com to Franklin Street or to Canal Street.
Walk to Greenwich Street and then to the corner at Vestry Street in Tribeca.
Google map

Gallery Hours: Tuesday- Saturday, 11am-6pm

 

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