Category Archives: Talk/Panel

DAAN at College Art Association 2017 in NYC

The Diasporic Asian Art Network [DAAN] is delighted to announce the upcoming DAAN events during the College Art Association 2017 week in New York City from February 16-18, 2017. We hope that you can attend one or all of them!
DAAN GALLERY VISIT: Art 100 Gallery New York
Thursday, February 16
555 West 25th Street, Ground Floor
Free event
5h30pm — Discussion with Art 100 New York Gallery Director Michelle Loh
6h00pm — Exhibition opening reception for Construction and Contemplation: Noa Charuvi, Li Gang
 
About the exhibit:
Construction and Contemplation 
Noa Charuvi, Li Gang
Opening Reception: Thursday, February 16, 2017 6pm-8pm
February 16  – March 31, 2017

Noa Charuvi was born in Jerusalem, and now lives and works in New York City.  She holds a Master’s Degree in Fine Art from the School of Visual Arts in New York and a Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Art from the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem.   Her work is in the Time Equities collection and has been exhibited internationally, including at the Bronx Museum of Art and the Haifa Museum of Arts in Israel.  

Li Gang was born in Guangdong, China in 1962.  He now lives and works in Beijing. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing.  Li’s work has been exhibited in Strasbourg, France, Heidelberg, Germany, the Venice Biennale; and in China at Today Art Museum among others.  His work is held in the collection of the Central Academy of Fine Arts Museum, the Shanghai Artists Association, and the Guangdong Museum of Art.

 Noa Charuvi, White Sheet, Oil on Canvas
 

Li Gang, No 20161018, Ink on Paper

 
DAAN AFFILIATED SOCIETY PANEL CAA:

CANADA 150: Asian Canadians and Visual Culture in National Celebrations

Saturday, Feb 18, 2017
3:30PM – 5:00 PM
New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 6th Ave, New York
Regent Parlor, 2nd Floor
Conference registration required

Chairs: Alice Ming Wai Jim, Concordia University; Victoria Nolte, Carleton University

Souvenirs of the Self and The Long View: Canadian National Parks and the Transnational Asian Canadian Subject within Nature
Jin-me Yoon, Simon Fraser University

Collecting “Strangeness” and “Familiarity”: Asian Canadian Photo-Poetics
Glenn Deer, University of British Columbia

Transnational Kinship, Diasporic Mourning, and Belonging in the Canadian Animation World: The Moving Images of Leslie Supnet’s gains + losses
Marissa Largo, University of Toronto

 

 

Courtesy of the artist. Jin-me Yoon, video still, Other Hauntings: A Geography Beloved (Dance), 2016, Single channel video.
More about Jin-me Yoon’s work: Through the use of gestures, activist Tera maps the geography of Gangjeong village, Jeju Island, South Korea onto her body; the beloved intimate landscape she struggles to preserve in the face ecological and social devastation caused by the recent construction of a Naval Base. A strange apparition, a seaweed-headed soldier of ambiguous gender, troubles our understanding of masculinity as well as the acceptance of military state-sanctioned violence against citizens, creatures small and large, the land, sea and all sustaining life ways.
DAAN DINNER:
After the DAAN panel, we will be gathering to go to Chinatown to visit the changing neighborhood including the new Pearl River Mart with their gallery space now showing work by artist Wiena Lin. We will talk with Pearl River Mart president Joanne Kwong. We will also visit other spaces and end for dinner at August Gatherings, 266 Canal Street (between Cortlandt Alley and Lafayette St). We will also discuss DAAN business at the start of the dinner. Dinner is Dutch treat. Please RSVP to achang@nyu.edu

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Predicament of Contemporary Artists: Represent or Subdue Ethnicity? by Kyunghee Pyun, Ph.D at the Korean Cultural Center, NYC

AHL Public Lecture Series 2016
in Collaboration with the Korean Cultural Center NY
 
Predicament of Contemporary Artists:
Represent or Subdue Ethnicity?
by Kyunghee Pyun, Ph.D
 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Korean Cultural Center
460 Park Avenue (57th Street), 6th Floor
Free admission; refreshments provided
 
As contemporary art seeks a global dimension in its ambition and scale, many artists from Asia now work and live in two or three different countries. Identifying roles of race and ethnicity in contemporary art and lecture has been prominent in the past decade in related disciplines of art history, art criticism, comparative literature, and ethnic studies. In visual art as much as in film or literature, experience of growing up in an ethnic context has been represented and commented by its practitioners. In fact many critics focus on an artist’s ethnic or racial background as a cause of celebration or considers it a crucial tool to interpret his/her artistic creations. This paper aims to problematize this trend by analyzing recent exhibitions held in commercial as well as institutional art settings. While the myth of “Western Art” and its universality has been challenged and overcome, art works with strong ethnic and racial background have been promoted. One may wonder how the future would shape the current categorizing of contemporary artists by its ethnic or racial affinities.
Dr. Kyunghee Pyun is an assistant professor of history of art at Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. She has written on Asian art as well as European medieval art. Her focus of Asian art is Asian-American visual culture and reception of Asian art in Europe and North America. “Collectors of Asian Crafts in North America: Passion for Porcelain.” Journal for the Korean Society of Art and Design [Johyung Design Yeongu] (Dec. 2015) is one of many on collectors of Asian art. Her other research interests include Global trade of decorative arts in premodern Eurasia and Americas; usage and reception of visual art in context of religious performance and liturgy; interplay of word and image; and history of art collections. Her experience of teaching a diverse range of cultural exchange between Europe and Asia has become an article, “A Journey through the Silk Road in a Cosmopolitan Classroom” in Teaching Medieval and Early-Modern Cross-Cultural Encounters Across Disciplines and Eras edited by Lynn Shutters and Karina Attar (Palgrave, 2014). She was a 2015 recipient of the Field Research Grant Korea Foundation and a 2016 recipient of the SUNY Innovative Instructional Technology Grant (IITG). She is currently editing a book on dress reform in Asian in the early 20th century.
 
The AHL Foundation is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization founded in 2003 to support and promote visual artists of Korean heritage working in the United States. AHL’s diverse educational outreach programs including art history classes, museum & gallery tours, studio visits, artist talks and public lectures for the general public. For addition inquiries please contact info@ahlfoundation.org.
 
This program is funded, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the generous support from the NY Nanum Foundation.

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Resilience Archives: THE CULTURAL IMPACT OF PAINTING & PRINTED MEDIA: Artist lecture & creative lab — Lenore Chinn

http://www.resiliencearchives.com/the-cultural-impact-of-painting-printed-media-artist-lecture-creative-lab/

Resilience Archives:

THE CULTURAL IMPACT OF PAINTING & PRINTED MEDIA:
Artist lecture & creative lab

We ensure our histories are not lost by documenting them and Lenore Chinn has been documenting the broader LGBTQ community in San Francisco for over 30 years. Her larger photo-realist paintings began as community portraits, of her friends really, and are now a beautiful and sometimes haunting history. Lenore wraps up this series of workshop with a special artist lecture. She’ll discuss some of the highlights of her career as a painter and social justice founder of some of the most influential LGBTQ and Asian arts organizations in the Bay Area including the Lesbians in the Visual Arts, Queer Cultural Center, and Asian American Women Artists.

We’ll include an open Q&A section to open up the floor for conversation. Also view printed works inspired by the stories from the Dragonfruit Project and see works from other LGBTQ AAPI artists. The lecture will immediately be followed by an open creative lab where we’ll provide materials to create works around the LGBTQ AAPI communities and stories. You’ll see art that’s already been created and share space with other working artists. This is a great opportunity to share creative space with other working LGBTQ AAPI artists.

PROVIDED: A variety of creative materials will be provided to create works in class paper, pens, scanner, printer, glue, tape, scissors, etc.

INSTRUCTORS

Lenore Chinn: Artist
Mia Nakano: Director, Visibility Project

We will be requesting that all participants sign release forms at the beginning of each workshop allowing us to publish scans, audio stories, photos, artwork and other materials created in the workshop as a part of the Resilience Archives at www.resiliencearchives.com.

DATE & TIME

Sunday, August 7th
10am – 2pm

LOCATION

Oakland Asian Cultural Center
Auditorium
388 9th St. #290
Oakland, CA  94607

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Curators in Conversation: Eugenie Tsai at the Museum of Chinese in America, NY

http://www.mocanyc.org/visit/events/curators_conv_eugenie_tsai

Curators in Conversation: Eugenie Tsai

Wed, Mar 9, 2016 @ 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Tickets: $12/adult; $8/senior (65+) and students (with valid ID); FREE for MOCA members

Click here to purchase tickets

Location: Museum of Chinese in America

215 Centre Street, New York, NY

MOCA presents a dynamic new program series that engages Chinese American curators, artists and cultural producers across generations and geographies in critical conversations to deeply investigate the aesthetic concerns, subject matter, and experiences within the Chinese and Asian American cultural community.

 

The series is moderated by Herb Tam, Curator and Director of Exhibitions at MOCA.

Curator Bio:

 

Eugenie Tsai joined the Brooklyn Museum in the fall of 2007 as the John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art. With Patrick Amsellem, she organized 21: Selections of Contemporary Art from the Brooklyn Museum, a long-term installation that opened on September 19, 2008. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P. S. 1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004; Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota and a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

 

Upcoming Curators in Conversation:

 

Curators in Conversation: Christopher Y. Lew

Friday, May 20, 2016 | 6:30pm

 

Curators in Conversation: Xin Wang

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 | 6:30pm

 

Curators in Conversation: Paul Chan

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 6:30pm

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Country of Dreams: Art Festival as Social Change at Japan Society

Wednesday, April 27, 6:30 PM

Location

Japan Society
333 East 47th Street
New York, NY 10017

Abandoned buildings repurposed as surreal dream houses, a million tulip petals falling from the sky: every three years the remote snow country of Echigo-Tsumari is transformed into a spellbinding art festival. Conceived as a way of revitalizing a depopulated region, the Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale is not only one of the world’s largest art festivals, it is a powerful force for social change. In collaboration with the local community, the bucolic landscape is turned into a multi-media exhibit space, drawing in artists and admirers from around the world. Come hear from participating artists Marina Abramović, Cai Guo-Qiang, and Ilya & Emilia Kabakov, as well as creator and General Director Fram Kitagawa. Co-organized by Midori Yamamura.

Tickets: $13/$10 Japan Society members, seniors & students

Buy tickets here

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Media as Singularities — Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai at NYU

“Media as Singularities”
Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai 
at NYU Einstein Auditorium, 34 Stuyvesant St, New York, NY 10003
Sun, March 6 at 4pm6pm.
map https://goo.gl/maps/Qmc8sz5kgZr

 
We begin with Masayuki Kawai and Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo) discussing Media as Singularities then a feedback performance by Kawai. Then, Zhen Zhang of NYU Tisch Cinema Studies and Tom Looser from East Asian Studies at NYU will join to talk about Kawai’s work.
It is open to public and free of charge.
Symposium/lecture:
USA: Tom Looser (NYU)

Zhen Zhang (NYU)
Japan: Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo)

Masayuki Kawai (video artist)
Inline image 1
Video Feedback Live Performance by Masayuki Kawai:
Masayuki Kawai builds a video feedback system composed of dozens of analog audio-visual devices. He shows the machine on site as an installation and operates it as live performance as well. Kawai’s “Video Feedback” works are made with an analog video feedback from a closed circuit system with free-flowing electronic data. No outer video/sound source is used; the video machines and circuits contain subtle noises that are amplified in the loop to generate infinite data flows. When these are put into the video input, they display various figure and colour mutations. When these are channeled into the audio input, they make sounds that are synchronized with the image. It is impossible to make these images and sounds by computer programing-simulation because the digital process eliminates the noise and gives privilege to the signals. Thus, through these works, we directly experience an organic creation of singularity with analog electronic video.

About Media as Singularities

Flush with emergencies, probabilities and preemptions, is the situation under control or out of control? Shock, noise, accident, event, etc., any such exceptional anomaly now seems to be captured by the networks to improve their flexible, robust and sustainable creativities of the self-controlling collective security against frightening unknowable aliens.
A conceptual observation of glitch, however, would provide another view; glitch, not as an error, but as a rhythm of recursive generation of a pattern, which is simultaneously singular and multiple. This paradoxical concept of glitch envisions the real and virtual power of a non-digital and in-formal logic as the potential of the technological environment. It is not simply a break cutting into a connection or opening a hole into a containment. It is not statistical digital uncertainty of unpredictable contingencies or the coming transcendental future. On the contrary, it is a sensation of immaterial materialities of the networks to metamorphose their process of auto-production. They are the conditions of the possibilities of the techno-political ecology. This rhythm is felt resonance of autonomous-and-heteronomous vibrations of the living singularities.
An ethico-aesthetic task of media as singularities is to construct a sensor for these living singularities, transducing them into the sensible as an existing alternative track: Media, the immanent future.

 

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DAAN-NY tour of Alternative Dimension

https://www.facebook.com/events/1673529579551782/

Please join this DAAN-NY regional event!

DAAN-NYEventpic

at 3 PM – 6 PM
Project:ARTspace
156 Fifth Avenue, Suite 308
New York, NY 10010

 

Are you an artist/curator/scholar of the Asian diaspora in NYC? want to connect with others in the Diasporic Asian Arts Network (DAAN)? Meet up with DAAN-NY at Project:ARTspace on February 28th from 3pm-6pm.

Michelle Yoh will give us a tour of Alternative Dimension, her most recent curation featuring the work of Lisa Corinne Davis and Maureen Hoon.

Here’s info on the show:
Alternative Dimension
Lisa Corinne Davis, Maureen Hoon
Curated by Michelle Y. Loh

We construct our imagination and identity, to a great extent, based on recorded images and predefined concepts, received labels and fictions that allow us to make quotidian sense of the world. Questioning our received labels and fictions provides an opening where we can access our imagination and identity anew. Coming from different generations, raised in different hemispheres, Lisa Corinne Davis and Maureen Hoon creates works that are different on the surface, yet both artists bend representations of the physical world to a similar purpose. Drawing references from the urban environment, their works allude to materiality, space, image, and affect, and provide access to new ways of seeing and understanding.

http://projectartspace.com/exhibition/alternative-dimensions/

If you want to become a DAAN member to include your profile on the DAAN listing or to sign up for emails, visit http://www.nyu-apastudies.org/research/DAAN/?page_id=5

 

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Diasporic Asian Art Network Panel Session: Asian Latino Art and Visual Cultures: Current Scholarship and Institutional Practices — at CAA 2015 in Washington DC

DAAN LOGO

 

Diasporic Asian Art Network Panel Session:
Saturday, February 6, 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel; Room: Washington 5, Exhibition Level

Asian Latino Art and Visual Cultures:
Current Scholarship and Institutional Practices

Panelists:

On Circles and Circuits: An exhibition on Chinese Caribbean Art at the Chinese American Museum
Alexandra Chang, chair
Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs, NYU A/P/A Institute

Chinese American Museum: From Localized Histories to Global Approaches
Steven Wong
Senior Curator, Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles

Building a Cultural Laboratory: the Smithsonian Asian-Latino Project and New Models of Cross-Cultural Exhibition and Education
Adriel Luis
Curator of Digital and Emerging Media, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center

Guest Editor of ADVA Journal Special Issue “Memory and Migration”
Anna Kazumi Stahl
Director, Global Program, NYU Buenos Aires

This panel on Asian Latino art and visual cultures will range from historic to contemporary art and present some current scholarship on mobilities of images, goods, people, and ideas on the envisioning of Asia in Latin America as well as art practice. The panel will also include current projects from community-based and national-based institutions, the Chinese American Museum in LA and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC and the Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas [ADVA] journal.

Special thanks to DAAN Panel Committee Chair Alice Ming Wai Jim and Committee Members ShiPu Wang, Leila Philip and Binod Shrestha

 

Bios

Alexandra Chang is Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs at the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University, where she is Project Director of the Virtual Asian American Museum and Co-Editor of the journal Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas (ADVA). She is the Director of the NYU Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange (GAX) and Co-Organizer of the East Coast Asian American Art Project (ECAAAP). She is also the co-organizer of the Diasporic Asian Art Network (DAAN) and serves on CAA’s International Committee. She was Managing Editor of Art Asia Pacific and is the author of Envisioning Diaspora: Asian American Visual Art Collectives from Godzilla, Godzookie, to the Barnstormers.

Adriel Luis is a self-taught musician, poet, curator, coder, and visual artist who believes imagination is key to transforming cultural paradigms. Adriel is currently based in Washington DC as the Curator of Digital and Emerging Media at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, where he is focused on exploring intersectional identities in the U.S. and contemporary Asian diasporic art. He is a founding member of the iLL-Literacy arts collective, and also produces and performs music independently. Adriel frequently travels to different parts of Asia with particular interest in how digital space shapes global communities, and how varying levels of freedom of expression channel artistic political imagination. Adriel can be found across online platforms as @DRZZL.

Anna Kazumi Stahl is a fiction writer and PhD working in literature and critical mixed race studies. Based in Argentina, Stahl is Director of NYU Buenos Aires. Serving on Fulbright and PEN/Argentina, she lectures at MALBA museum and assists in J.M. Coetzee’s UNSAM seminars on Literatures of the Southern Hemisphere.

Steven Wong is the Senior Curator at the Chinese American Museum based in Los Angeles.  Mr. Wong is an artist, contemporary art curator and the curator of history at the museum.  His academic interests include Chinese transnational labor migration from the 1850-1930, the role of Orientalism in the construction of Chinatowns and tourist economies, the post-1965 Chinese American middle-class in the United states and the formation of ethnoburbs.  In 2012, he co-curated an exhibition for the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980  titled Breaking Ground: Chinese American Architects in Los Angeles at CAM which was the first comprehensive exhibit about a group of pioneering Chinese American architects whose designs continue to influence the landscape of Southern California.  He recently co-curated Origins: The Birth and Rise of Chinese American Communities in Los Angeles which is the largest permanent exhibition on the West Coast about the settlement of Chinese immigrants in Southern California from the 19th Century to the present day.  Furthermore, he curated a contemporary art exhibition titled (de)Constructing Chinatown which opened the door to local artists to re-imagine one of the oldest communities in Los Angeles through multimedia forms.  Mr. Wong holds a Masters in Asian American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (1998) and a Master in Fine Arts from the University of California (2000).

 

apa_identity_vertical_blackThe Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU is the institutional sponsor of DAAN

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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World book launch and panel at Queens Museum of Art

http://www.queensmuseum.org/events/zhang-hongtu-expanding-visions-of-a-shrinking-world

ZH

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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World
Book Launch and Panel Discussion

Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World is edited  by Luchia Meihua Lee, guest curator of Zhang Hongtu, and Jerome Silbergeld. Twelve leading art experts, art historians, and critics have reviewed the life, career, and artistic development of New York based Chinese artist Zhang Hongtu. Please join us for a conversation about the book and exhibition with Jerome Silbergeld and contributors Eugenie Tsai and Lilly Wei.

A pioneer in contemporary Chinese art, Zhang created the first example of “China Pop” art, and his oeuvre is as diverse, intellectually complex, and engaging as it is entertaining. From painting and sculpture to computer generated works and multimedia projects, Zhang’s art is equally rich in terms of China’s history and its current events, containing profound reflections on China’s oldest cultural habits and contemporary preoccupations. He provides a model of cross-cultural interaction designed to make Asian and Western audiences look more closely at each other and at themselves to recognize the beliefs they hold and the unexamined values they adhere to.

From his early work in China during the Cultural Revolution to his decades as an artist in New York, Zhang reflects the complex attitudes of a scholar-artist toward modernity, as well as toward Asian and Western societies and himself.  Placing Zhang in the context of his cultural milieu both in China and in the Chinese immigrant artist community in America, this volume’s contributors examine his adaptations of classic art to reflect a contemporary sensibility, his relation to Cubism and Social Realism, his collaboration with the celebrated fashion designer Vivienne Tam, and his visual critique of China’s current environmental crisis.

Jerome Silbergeld is the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History at Princeton University and director of Princeton’s Tang Center for East Asian Art. A specialist in Song-Yuan period painting, he has published more than eighty books, catalogues, articles, and book chapters on topics in traditional and contemporary Chinese painting, traditional architecture and gardens, cinema and photography. He has also curated and co-curated eight exhibitions, including the first major solo exhibition in America by a Chinese artist, in 1988. His books on cinema and photography include China Into Film, Hitchcock with a Chinese Face, and Humanism in China. On contemporary art, his books includeContradictions: Artistic Life, the Socialist State, and the Chinese Painter Li Huasheng, the first extensive study of any PRC artist, which became a New York Times notable book of the year in 1993; Outside In, on the globalization and loss of “Chineseness” of Chinese art; and ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art.

Eugenie Tsai has been John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum since 2007. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P.S.1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University

Lilly Wei is a New York-based independent curator and critic whose focus is global contemporary art. She has written regularly for Art in America since 1984 and is a contributing editor at ARTnews and  formerly one at Art Asia Pacific.  Among other national and international publications, Wei has also written for Art & Australia, Asian Art News, Sanat Dünyamiz, Art Papers, Sculpture Magazine, Studio International, Tema Celeste, Flash Art, Art Press, and Art and Auction, and has frequently reported on international biennials such as those of Venice, Sydney, Cairo, Athens, Reykjavik, Shenzhen and Hong Kong and international exhibitions such as Documenta and Sonsbeek, the sculpture international in the Netherlands.  She has been the author of many exhibition catalogues and brochures on contemporary art, including publications for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Knoedler, Marlborough and Pace Galleries, New York, NY. She has curated numerous exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Asia. Two of her most recent exhibitions were “The Museum Imagined” at Danese/Corey, New York, NY, and “Uncanny/Figure” at Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs.  Wei lectures on critical and curatorial practices and serves on numerous advisory committees and review panels.  She was born in Chengdu, China and has an MA in art history from Columbia University, New York.

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1975 — featuring artists Anida Yoeu Ali, Amy Lee Sanford, LinDa Saphan, Curated by Chuong-Dai Vo — at University Gallery at UMASS Lowell

1975
at University Gallery at UMASS Lowell
With artists Anida Yoeu Ali, Amy Lee Sanford, LinDa Saphan
Curated by Chuong-Dai Vo
Exhibition runs through Feb 27, 2016

Talk on Thursday, Feb 11, 2016 at 3h30-6h30pm:

https://www.facebook.com/events/156349468073946/

The UMASS Lowell Dept. of Art & Design is pleased to present a panel discussion with the artists from 1975, an exhibit of work by Cambodian American artists who engage with themes of war, memory, displacement and globalization. The panel discussion with Anida Yoeu Ali, Amy Lee Sanford and LinDa Saphan will take place in the O’Leary Library room 222 from 3:30 – 4:45, followed by a reception for the artists in the University Gallery in Mahoney Hall. All of these events take place on the South Campus of UMASS Lowell. Please email the Gallery Coordinator, Deborah_Santoro@uml.edu for more information.

1975

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