Monthly Archives: January 2015

Blue Hawai’i — Laura Kina — at New Jersey City University Harold B. Lemmerman Gallery

Laura Kina — BLUE HAWAI'I

Laura Kina — BLUE HAWAI’I


January 27 – March 3, 2015

“Blue Hawai’i” is traveling to
New Jersey City University
Harold B. Lemmerman Gallery

Artist Reception: January 29, 4:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Harold B. Lemmerman Gallery – Hepburn Hall 323

Artist Talk: March 2, 5:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Gothic Lounge (Hepburn Hall room 202) followed by Gallery Reception
(Participates NJCU Women’s History Month)

“You won’t find Elvis or surfboards or funny umbrella-topped cocktails in my dystopic Blue Hawaiʻi.” The Chicago-based artist Laura Kina speaks of her latest series of paintings which are featured in this exhibition at NJCU.

Drawn from her family albums, oral history and community archives, Kina’s ghostly oil paintings employ distilled memories to investigate themes of distance, longing, and belonging. The setting of these paintings is her father’s Okinawan sugarcane field plantation community, Piʻihonua, on the Big Island of Hawaiʻi near Hilo. The predominant blue color of the series was inspired by the indigo-dyed kasuri kimonos repurposed by the Issei (first generation) “picture bride” immigrants for canefield work clothes. Blue Hawaiʻi echoes the spirits of Kina’s ancestors and shared histories of labor migration.

Laura Kina is Vincent de Paul professor of Art, Media, & Design at DePaul University. She is the coeditor, along with Wei Ming Dariotis, of War Baby/Love Child: Mixed Race Asian American Art (University of Washington Press, 2013); cofounder of the DePaul biennial Critical Mixed Race Studies conference; and cofounder and consulting editor of the Journal of Critical Mixed Race Studies and reviews editor for the Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas.

Her solo exhibitions include Blue Hawaii (2014), Sugar (2010), A Many-Splendored Thing (2010), Aloha Dreams (2007), Loving (2006), and Hapa Soap Operas (2003). She has exhibited at the Chicago Cultural Center, India Habitat Centre, Nehuru Art Centre, Okinawa Prefectural Art Museum, the Rose Art Museum, the Spertus Museum, the University of Memphis, and the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience.

Image: Laura Kina, Canefield Workers, 2013, oil on canvas, 30 x 45 inches.

View the online catalog and read the essay “Okinawan Diaspora Blues” by Wesley Ueunten HERE.

The Harold B. Lemmerman Gallery

Hepburn Hall room 323

New Jersey City University

2039 Kennedy Blvd.

Jersey City, NJ 07305

Tel: 201-200-3246

http://njcu.edu/Harold_B_Lemmerman_Gallery.aspx

Facebook invite: https://www.facebook.com/events/632876656824153/?source=1

Gallery Hours M-F 11am to 5pm

For further information, email gallery director Midori Yoshimoto at myoshimoto@njcu.edu

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“On Kawara — Silence” — at the Guggenheim Museum, NYC Feb 6-May 3, 2015

http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/exhibitions/upcoming/on-kawara-silence

On Kawara — Silence

at the Guggenheim Museum, NYC

Through radically restricted means, On Kawara’s work engages the personal and historical consciousness of place and time. Kawara’s practice is often associated with the rise of Conceptual art, yet in its complex wit and philosophical reach, it stands well apart.

Organized with the cooperation of the artist, On Kawara—Silence will be the first full representation of Kawara’s output, beginning in 1964 and including every category of work, much of it produced during his travels across the globe: date paintings (the Today series); postcards (the I Got Up series); telegrams (the I Am Still Alive series); maps (the I Went series); lists of names (the I Metseries); newspaper cuttings (the I Read series); the inventory of paintings (Journals); and calendars (One Hundred Years and One Million Years). The exhibition will also present numerous drawings produced in Paris in 1964, which are fascinating proposals for unrealized works; and Kawara’s only two extant paintings of 1965, Location and Title, which herald the Today series. In conjunction with the exhibition, the Guggenheim will organize a continuous live reading of the artist’s One Million Years, the steady recitation of numbers from a vast ledger, which will be performed on the ground floor of the Guggenheim rotunda.

On Kawara’s paintings were first shown at the Guggenheim Museum in the 1971 Guggenheim International Exhibition. Over 40 years later this large exhibition will transform the Frank Lloyd Wright rotunda—itself a form that signifies movement through time and space—into a site within which audiences can reflect on an artistic practice of cumulative power and depth.

Visiting information:

http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/visit

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Manuel Ocampo The Corrections — at Tyler Rollins Fine Art

 

Tyler Rollins Fine Art
MANUEL OCAMPO
THE CORRECTIONS
JANUARY 8 – FEBRUARY 14, 2015
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, FROM 6 – 8 PM

Manuel Ocampo has been a vital presence on the international art scene for over twenty years. Now based in Manila, the Philippines, he had an extended residency in California in the late 1980s and early 1990s and continues to spend significant time working in both the US and Europe. For The Corrections, his third solo exhibition with Tyler Rollins Fine Art (January 8 – February 14, 2015), Ocampo looks back with a critical eye on his early work, making “corrections” to certain key paintings from the 1990s. Using photographs of his older paintings, he rearranges, reconstructs, and reimagines various motifs, then silkscreens the radically altered images onto the canvas, often in a form resembling photo negatives. New interventions are then hand painted on top of these images, creating rich, multi-layered compositions that capture a sense of the passing of time, the evolution of consciousness, and the ongoing structuring of personal and group identities. Many of Ocampo’s works in the early 1990s were inspired by his experience living in Los Angeles during the race riots of 1992, and this new series of paintings is in turn influenced by the current racially charged environment in the United States in the aftermath of a number of police shooting incidents around the country, particularly in Ferguson, Missouri. They also evoke some dark periods in the history of the Philippines, including subjugation by Spain in the 16th century and the brutal Philippine–American War of 1899–1902.

Born in 1965 in Manila, the Philippines, Ocampo gained early recognition as a young artist living in California in the 1980s. His first solo exhibition, which took place in Los Angeles in 1988, set the stage for a rapid rise to international prominence. By the early 1990s, his reputation was firmly established, with inclusion in two of the most important European art events, Documenta IX (1992) and the Venice Biennale (1993). 
Also in the early 1990s, he participated in the landmark exhibition, Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1992), as well as Individual Realities in the California Art Scene at the Sezon Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo (1991), and Jean-Michel Basquiat & Manuel Ocampo at the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle (1994). He has subsequently participated in numerous museum exhibitions and biennials around the world, including the biennials of Gwangju (1997), Lyon (2000), Berlin (2001), Venice for a second time (2001), Seville (2004), and the Asia Pacific Triennial (2012).

Ocampo is known for fearlessly tackling the taboos and cherished icons of society and of the art world itself. During the 1990s, he was noted for his bold use of a highly charged iconography that combines Catholic imagery with motifs associated with racial and political oppression, creating works that make powerful, often conflicted, statements about the vicissitudes of personal and group identities. His works illustrate, often quite graphically, the psychic wounds that cut deep into the body of contemporary society. They translate the visceral force of Spanish Catholic art, with its bleeding Christs and tortured saints, into our postmodern, more secular era of doubt, uncertainty, and instability. In recent years, his works have featured more mysterious yet emotionally charged motifs that evoke an inner world of haunting visions and nightmares. He often makes use of an eclectic array of quasi-religious, highly idiosyncratic icons featuring teeth, fetuses, sausages, and body parts alongside more traditional Christian motifs. The process of artistic creation is often a central concern, with many works making ironic commentaries on notions of artistic inspiration, originality, and the anxiety of influence. The artist himself is frequently the subject of parody and self-mockery; sometimes he appears as a buzzard, a kind of cultural scavenger, or assumes slightly deranged alter egos. He frequently includes sly references to the works of other artists, just as in the past he often referred to the work of provincial painters of Catholic altars.

529 WEST 20 STREET, 10W  NEW YORK, NY  10011 INFO@TRFINEART.COM +1 212 229 9100 WWW.TRFINEART.COM

 

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