Tag Archives: Anida Yoeu Ali

1975 — featuring artists Anida Yoeu Ali, Amy Lee Sanford, LinDa Saphan, Curated by Chuong-Dai Vo — at University Gallery at UMASS Lowell

1975
at University Gallery at UMASS Lowell
With artists Anida Yoeu Ali, Amy Lee Sanford, LinDa Saphan
Curated by Chuong-Dai Vo
Exhibition runs through Feb 27, 2016

Talk on Thursday, Feb 11, 2016 at 3h30-6h30pm:

https://www.facebook.com/events/156349468073946/

The UMASS Lowell Dept. of Art & Design is pleased to present a panel discussion with the artists from 1975, an exhibit of work by Cambodian American artists who engage with themes of war, memory, displacement and globalization. The panel discussion with Anida Yoeu Ali, Amy Lee Sanford and LinDa Saphan will take place in the O’Leary Library room 222 from 3:30 – 4:45, followed by a reception for the artists in the University Gallery in Mahoney Hall. All of these events take place on the South Campus of UMASS Lowell. Please email the Gallery Coordinator, Deborah_Santoro@uml.edu for more information.

1975

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Asian American Literary Review releases: (Re)Collecting the Vietnam War

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                 July 15, 2015

CONTACT: Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, Editor-In-Chief, The Asian American Literary Review

editors@aalrmag.org                      www.aalrmag.org

 

ASIAN AMERICAN LITERARY REVIEW RELEASES SPECIAL ISSUE EXPLORING LEGACIES OF THE VIETNAM WAR, COMMEMORATING 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF FALL OF SAIGON

 

April 30, 2015 marked the 40th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon, the end of a war that claimed the lives of an estimated 58,260 American troops and over 4 million Southeast Asians across Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. In the U.S. today, “Vietnam” signifies not a country but a lasting syndrome that haunts American politics and society, from debates about foreign policy to popular culture. But what of the millions of Southeast Asian refugees the War created? What, in this moment of commemoration and reflection, are the lasting legacies of the Vietnam War / American War for Southeast Asian diasporic communities?

 

(Re)Collecting the Vietnam War, a special issue of The Asian American Literary Review slated for release in late summer 2015, poses these questions to leading artists, writers, and thinkers. Novel in form and approach, the issue is an innovative teaching tool, contemplating the conflict as both remembered and traumatic event through a wealth of original multimedia art, a sweeping flipbook animation running the length of the collection, literary and scholarly engagements, and more.

 

Guest-edited by Cathy J. Schlund-Vials and Sylvia Shin Huey Chong, with guest curation by Mariam Lam, Viet Le, and Vo Chuong-Dai, the issue features contributions by Monique Truong and UuDam Nguyen, Lan Cao, Kao Kalia Yang, Nick Ut, Yen Le Espiritu, Anida Yoeu Ali, Sayon Syprasoeuth, Soul Vang, Bryan Thao Worra, Yong Soon Min, Hoi Trinh, Viet Thanh Nguyen, Phothyzan Bounpaul, Frederic Sanchez, Vandy Rattana, Nguyen Tan Hoang, Cathy Linh Che, Bao Phi and Simrat Kang, Mai Der Vang, Jai Arun Ravine, Bee Vang and Louisa Schein, and Ocean Vuong, among others. The issue also forms the core of a teaching program that will virtually connect university classrooms across the country to teach and learn together about the War and the worlds it created.

 

Sponsors include:

 

Association for Asian American Studies • Institute for Asia and Asia Diasporas at Binghamton University SUNY • University of Connecticut Asian and Asian American Studies Institute • Southeast Asia: Text, Ritual and Performance • Race and Ethnic Studies, St. Olaf College • Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU • UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Department • Department of English and the Division of Arts and Humanities at Queens College, CUNY • Department of American Studies, University of Maryland, Baltimore County • UC Irvine Department of Asian American Studies • Northwestern University Asian American Studies Program • UMass Lowell Center for Asian American Studies • University of Pennsylvania Asian American Studies Program • Mt. Holyoke College English Department • Y-Dang Troeung • Jennifer Hayashida & Benj Gerdes • Ma Vang, School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, UC Merced • University of Minnesota Department of Curriculum & Instruction • Department of Asian American Studies at UCLA • Wesleyan University, Academic Affairs and College of East Asian Studies • UMass Boston Asian American Studies Program • UC San Diego Ethnic Studies Department • University of Virginia Department of English and Asian Pacific American Studies • Viet Le • Diasporic Vietnamese Artists Network

 

To see a sample table of contents, or to order the issue, visit http://aalr.binghamton.edu/recollecting-the-vietnam-war-table-of-contents/. To inquire about the teaching program or institutional subscription, please contact us at editors@aalrmag.org.

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Teaching the Legacies of the Vietnam War — AALR

http://aalr.binghamton.edu/teaching-the-legacies-of-the-vietnam-war/

April 30, 2015 marks the 40th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon, the end of a war that claimed the lives of an estimated 58,260 American troops and over 4 million Southeast Asians across Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. In the U.S. today, “Vietnam” signifies not a country but a lasting syndrome that haunts American politics and society, from debates about foreign policy to popular culture. And what of the millions of Southeast Asian refugees the War created? What, in this moment of commemoration and reflection, are the lasting legacies of the Vietnam War / American War for Southeast Asian diasporic communities?

 

(Re)Collecting the Vietnam War, a special issue of The Asian American Literary Review slated for release in fall 2015, poses these questions to leading artists, writers, and thinkers. Novel in form and approach, the issue is an innovative teaching tool, contemplating the conflict as both remembered and traumatic event through a wealth of original multimedia art, a sweeping flipbook animation running the length of the collection, spreads of critical-creative cartography, and more. Guest-edited by Cathy J. Schlund-Vials and Sylvia Chong, with guest curation by Mariam Lam, Viet Le, and Chuong-Dai Vo, the issue features contributions byMonique Truong, Lan Cao, Kao Kalia Yang, Nick Ut, Yen Le Espiritu, Maya Espiritu,Anida Yoeu Ali, Emily Hue, Sayon Syprasoeuth, Soul Vang, Bryan Thao Worra, An-My Le, Yong Soon Min, Hoi Trinh, Viet Nguyen, Phothyzan Bounpaul, Sovan Philong, Frederic Sanchez, Vandy Rattana, Andre Yang, Nguyen Tan Hoang, Cathy Linh Che,Bao Phi, Mai Der Vang, Jai Arun Ravine, Bee Vang and Louisa Schein, Thi Bui, and Simrat Kang, among others.

 

 

TEACHING PROGRAM

(Re)Collecting the Vietnam War forms the core of a teaching program that will virtually connect university classrooms across the country to teach and learn together about the War and the worlds it created. You teach the special issue, and we’ll provide dynamic resources and opportunities for interaction with other classrooms. We’ll have in place “digital extras,” videos and podcasts by editors, curators, and contributors, as well as a shared curriculum of activities and projects building from the issue, including interactive virtual spaces designed to put students in conversation with one another. We’ll also help seed one-on-one videoconferencing between classes for those interested. The goal is a national conversation that builds academic community, a dialogue among students and teachers across the U.S. and beyond that challenges and grows our understandings of the War and its complex aftermath.

 

HOW IT CAN WORK FOR MY CLASSROOM

To accommodate a wide variety of schedules and class needs, we’re making the commitment open-ended: we’ll have the program live throughout the fall and early winter of 2015, from September through mid-December, with curricular materials and exchange possibilities available throughout—but your class can participate for anywhere from a week to the entire academic term.

 

PARTICIPATING CLASSROOMS

10 professors at 9 universities have already pledged to participate, and we expect many more as the program develops: Cathy J. Schlund-Vials, University of Connecticut • Sylvia Chong, University of Virginia • Mimi Khúc, University of Maryland • Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis, University of Maryland • Catherine Fung, Bentley University • Y-Dang Troeung, Southeast Asia Research Centre, City University of Hong Kong • Caroline Hong, Queens College, City University of New York • Audrey Wu Clark, U.S. Naval Academy • Ma Vang, University of California, Merced • Sue Kim, University of Massachusetts Lowell

 

SPECIAL ISSUE/TEACHING PROGRAM SPONSORS

This special issue and its teaching program are proudly sponsored by:

 

Institute for Asia and Asia Diasporas at Binghamton University of the State University of New York • University of Connecticut Asian and Asian American Studies Institute • University of Maryland Asian American Studies Program • Southeast Asia: Text, Ritual and Performance • Race and Ethnic Studies, St. Olaf College • Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University • University of California, Berkeley Ethnic Studies Department • Department of English and the Division of Arts and Humanities at Queens College, City University of New York (CUNY) • Department of American Studies, University of Maryland, Baltimore County • University of California, Irvine Department of Asian American Studies • Northwestern University Asian American Studies Program • University of Massachusetts Lowell Center for Asian American Studies • University of Pennsylvania Asian American Studies Program

 

If you’re interested in joining the teaching program, sponsoring or otherwise supporting the issue, or learning more, please contact us at editors@aalrmag.org.

 

 

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1975: Group Exhibition of Diasporic Cambodian Art — Kickstarter campaign!

A Kickstarter campaign to support the exhibition “1975” Group Exhibition of Diasporic Cambodian Art at Topaz Arts in Queens, NY

1975 kickstarter

What is this fundraiser for? 

An exhibition titled 1975, featuring works by Anida Yoeu Ali, Amy Lee Sanford, and LinDa Saphan, and curated by Chuong-Dai Vo.

Opening reception: April 27, 2013, 6pm-8pm
On view: April 27-May 26, 2013, by appointment & Saturday Noon-4pm
Location: Topaz Arts, 55-03 39th Avenue, Queens, NY 11377

What is the exhibition about? 

This exhibition brings together three diasporic Cambodian, woman artists whose works exemplify the dynamic contemporary art scene in Phnom Penh: Anida Yoeu Ali’s photographs and video installation recall life in a refugee camp following the fall of the Khmer Rouge; Amy Lee Sanford’s video and prints share with viewers the process of uncovering a difficult history, the turmoil of the late 1960s and 1970s, as told in letters written by a father she never knew; and LinDa Saphan’s drawings of apartment buildings and architectural monuments in current-day Phnom Penh take us back to her mother’s memories of living there.

Why is this exhibition important?

The Khmer Rouge regime killed 1.7 million people and left another one million as refugees; 90% of the country’s artists were killed or were forced to flee. In the last three decades, a new generation of artists has been rebuilding the country and creating a new cultural scene.

This exhibition is planned to coincide with Season of Cambodia, an unprecedented initiative bringing more than 125 Cambodian artists to New York City, to highlight the post-1979 rebirth of the arts in the Southeast Asian country.

This exhibition, 1975, is historically significant because it is the only visual art event that foregrounds the contributions of woman artists and diasporic Cambodian artists to the construction of a post-war and post-genocide society. Although the dates for the exhibition coincide with the Season of Cambodia festival, the exhibition is independently organized and funded.

There are few exhibitions of contemporary Cambodian art in the world in general, and in the U.S. in particular. Your contribution will help us make this exhibition happen!

Who are the artists in the exhibition?

Anida Yoeu Ali is an artist and scholar whose works span performance, installation, video, poetry, public encounters, and political agitation. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to artmaking, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. She is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, an independent artist-run media lab in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, where she currently resides. For further details about her work and process, visit www.studio-revolt.com.

Amy Lee Sanford is a Cambodian American visual artist who works cross media, from drawing and sculpture to performance and video. Her art addresses the evolution of emotional stagnation, and the lasting psychological effects of war, including aspects of guilt, loss, alienation, and displacement. She was born in Phnom Penh during the Lon Nol government of the early 1970s; her father, an intellectual, sent her out of the country with his American wife nine months before the Khmer Rouge took over the country. Currently, she is an artist-in-residence with the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, through the Season of Cambodia events taking place in New York. Her work can be seen at www.amyleesanford.com.

LinDa Saphan was born in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Fleeing the Khmer Rouge regime, she and her family lived for more than two decades in Canada and France. In 2005, Saphan co-organized Visual Arts Open, a landmark contemporary art festival that introduced Cambodian artists to the international art market. Recognizing a lack of resources to support women artists in Cambodia, she established the “Selapak Neari” program the same year, providing workshops, networking opportunities, and an exhibition space for emerging women artists. At the same time, she curated the first group exhibition at the Ministry of Fine Arts and Culture. Saphan earned a PhD in Social Anthropology from the Sorbonne in 2007. Her work can be seen atwww.saphan.info.

Who is the curator?

Chuong-Dai Vo is an independent curator and writer based in NYC and a Visiting Scholar at MIT. Her curatorial and scholarly work focus on how war and diasporic migrations affect the production of literature, cinema and visual culture, in particular in the circuits between Asia and the U.S. She has received fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Fulbright Program and the University of California Pacific Rim Research Program, among others. Her most recent project was a co-curated group exhibition titled War is for the Living.

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CARE Package Opens in Philadelphia on 10/5/12

Twelve Gates Arts Presents:

CARE Package c/o Philadelphia, PA

Curated by Ombretta Agró Andruff in collaboration with the artists
October 5 – October 26, 2012
Opening Reception with the artists: Friday October 5, 6pm-8pm

51 North Second St., Old City
Philadelphia, PA 19106
info@twelvegatesarts.org
215.253.8578
http://twelvegatesarts.org/

Twelve Gates Arts is thrilled to host the inaugural showing of CARE Package a small-scale international traveling show of five female artists of Asian descent. Taking inspiration from the concept of care package sent to each host country, artists Shelly Bahl, Shelly Jyoti, Laura Kina, Saira Wasim, and Anida Yoeu Ali created multi-media “gifts” to be shared with local audiences. Philadelphia is the city where packages destined for Europe after WWII were assembled for shipment by the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE, Inc.); now it is set to be the first city to receive this unique gift. The universal concept of a gift here acts as a stage for the artists’ stories, which promise to tackle issues of nationhood, race, gender, religion, & economic exploitation.

Shelly Bahl is a visual and media artist born in Benares, India, and currently based in New York City. Her interdisciplinary work in drawing, painting, sculpture/ installation, photography and video, has appeared in a number of solo and group exhibitions in North America and internationally over the past 16 years. Her recent projects include group exhibitions at: Queens Museum of Art, White Box, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, India Art Summit, Aicon Gallery, and Religare Arts Initiative.

Shelly Jyoti is a New Delhi based visual artist, fashion-designer, a poet and an independent curator whose research centers on designs of  20th century textiles, costumes and historical iconographic elements within the cultural context of Indian history.  Her textile art series ‘Indigo Narratives ‘ (2009-12) and ‘Beyond Mithila’ (2008-12) have shown internationally and have been reviewed by leading national newspapers and Art magazines. Her essays and art publications are included in Sahitya Akademi of Indian English literature and Art magazines. She has lectured and held workshop series on 6 &7th Century Indian art-forms in academic institutions and international universities.

Laura Kina is Associate Professor of Art, Media, and Design at DePaul University in Chicago, IL. Her paintings and textile works address Asian American history and mixed race representations.  Her artwork has shown internationally and been published in Modeling Citizenship: Jewish and Asian American Writing (Temple University Press, 2011); Other Tongues: Mixed-Race Women Speak Out (Inanna Publications, 2010); and Embracing Ambiguity: Faces of the Future (Cal State Fullerton, 2010); The New Authentics: Artists of the Post-Jewish Generation (Spertus Museum, 2007).

Saira Wasim has carved a niche for herself with her innovative and meticulously crafted Persian miniatures, which she employs to make devastating political and social commentary. Ms. Wasim’s work has been widely feted, and has been exhibited at numerous prominent art institutions including the Whitney Museum of American Art, Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, the Asia Society in New York, and the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, CT. She has recently noted that persecution as an Ahmadiyya Muslim was key in shaping her artistic perspectives.  New York Times describes her work as “exquisite political cartoons that conjure and sometimes borrow directly from Norman Rockwell”.

Anida Yoeu Ali is a performance artist, writer, and global agitator. She is a first generation Muslim Khmer woman born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago. In 2011, Ali returned to work in Phnom Penh as part of her U.S. Fulbright Fellowship research on creation mythologies. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. From the Faroe Islands to the Bronx, Copenhagen to Ho Chi Minh City, she lectures, exhibits and performs internationally. Ali is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, an independent media lab operating out of Phnom Penh where she currently resides.

Ombretta Agrò Andruff is a New York-based freelance curator, art critic and consultant. She has curated solo and group shows in Europe, the US, and India, collaborating with museums, art festivals, and art fairs – such as Queens Museum of Art, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, The Armory Show, The Art Basel Miami Fair, The Downtown Arts Festival, The d.u.m.b.o. art under the Bridge Festival. She is a New York contributor for Italian art magazines Arte Critica, Tema Celeste, and Label and collaborates as well with the New York-based, The Art Tribune and New York Arts Magazine. She has recently joined the staff of Asian Contemporary Art Week as Associate Director.

Twelve Gates Arts (12G) is a non profit (501(c)(3) pending) organization created with the aim to showcase international arts bound by the sensibilities of a diaspora identity, including the South Asian identity, to create and promote projects crossing cultural and geographical boundaries, and to educate the community about diaspora culture.

 http://facebook.com/twelvegates

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