Tag Archives: Art

Media as Singularities — Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai at NYU

“Media as Singularities”
Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai 
at NYU Einstein Auditorium, 34 Stuyvesant St, New York, NY 10003
Sun, March 6 at 4pm6pm.
map https://goo.gl/maps/Qmc8sz5kgZr

 
We begin with Masayuki Kawai and Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo) discussing Media as Singularities then a feedback performance by Kawai. Then, Zhen Zhang of NYU Tisch Cinema Studies and Tom Looser from East Asian Studies at NYU will join to talk about Kawai’s work.
It is open to public and free of charge.
Symposium/lecture:
USA: Tom Looser (NYU)

Zhen Zhang (NYU)
Japan: Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo)

Masayuki Kawai (video artist)
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Video Feedback Live Performance by Masayuki Kawai:
Masayuki Kawai builds a video feedback system composed of dozens of analog audio-visual devices. He shows the machine on site as an installation and operates it as live performance as well. Kawai’s “Video Feedback” works are made with an analog video feedback from a closed circuit system with free-flowing electronic data. No outer video/sound source is used; the video machines and circuits contain subtle noises that are amplified in the loop to generate infinite data flows. When these are put into the video input, they display various figure and colour mutations. When these are channeled into the audio input, they make sounds that are synchronized with the image. It is impossible to make these images and sounds by computer programing-simulation because the digital process eliminates the noise and gives privilege to the signals. Thus, through these works, we directly experience an organic creation of singularity with analog electronic video.

About Media as Singularities

Flush with emergencies, probabilities and preemptions, is the situation under control or out of control? Shock, noise, accident, event, etc., any such exceptional anomaly now seems to be captured by the networks to improve their flexible, robust and sustainable creativities of the self-controlling collective security against frightening unknowable aliens.
A conceptual observation of glitch, however, would provide another view; glitch, not as an error, but as a rhythm of recursive generation of a pattern, which is simultaneously singular and multiple. This paradoxical concept of glitch envisions the real and virtual power of a non-digital and in-formal logic as the potential of the technological environment. It is not simply a break cutting into a connection or opening a hole into a containment. It is not statistical digital uncertainty of unpredictable contingencies or the coming transcendental future. On the contrary, it is a sensation of immaterial materialities of the networks to metamorphose their process of auto-production. They are the conditions of the possibilities of the techno-political ecology. This rhythm is felt resonance of autonomous-and-heteronomous vibrations of the living singularities.
An ethico-aesthetic task of media as singularities is to construct a sensor for these living singularities, transducing them into the sensible as an existing alternative track: Media, the immanent future.

 

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Diasporic Asian Art Network Panel Session: Asian Latino Art and Visual Cultures: Current Scholarship and Institutional Practices — at CAA 2015 in Washington DC

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Diasporic Asian Art Network Panel Session:
Saturday, February 6, 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel; Room: Washington 5, Exhibition Level

Asian Latino Art and Visual Cultures:
Current Scholarship and Institutional Practices

Panelists:

On Circles and Circuits: An exhibition on Chinese Caribbean Art at the Chinese American Museum
Alexandra Chang, chair
Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs, NYU A/P/A Institute

Chinese American Museum: From Localized Histories to Global Approaches
Steven Wong
Senior Curator, Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles

Building a Cultural Laboratory: the Smithsonian Asian-Latino Project and New Models of Cross-Cultural Exhibition and Education
Adriel Luis
Curator of Digital and Emerging Media, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center

Guest Editor of ADVA Journal Special Issue “Memory and Migration”
Anna Kazumi Stahl
Director, Global Program, NYU Buenos Aires

This panel on Asian Latino art and visual cultures will range from historic to contemporary art and present some current scholarship on mobilities of images, goods, people, and ideas on the envisioning of Asia in Latin America as well as art practice. The panel will also include current projects from community-based and national-based institutions, the Chinese American Museum in LA and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC and the Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas [ADVA] journal.

Special thanks to DAAN Panel Committee Chair Alice Ming Wai Jim and Committee Members ShiPu Wang, Leila Philip and Binod Shrestha

 

Bios

Alexandra Chang is Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs at the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University, where she is Project Director of the Virtual Asian American Museum and Co-Editor of the journal Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas (ADVA). She is the Director of the NYU Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange (GAX) and Co-Organizer of the East Coast Asian American Art Project (ECAAAP). She is also the co-organizer of the Diasporic Asian Art Network (DAAN) and serves on CAA’s International Committee. She was Managing Editor of Art Asia Pacific and is the author of Envisioning Diaspora: Asian American Visual Art Collectives from Godzilla, Godzookie, to the Barnstormers.

Adriel Luis is a self-taught musician, poet, curator, coder, and visual artist who believes imagination is key to transforming cultural paradigms. Adriel is currently based in Washington DC as the Curator of Digital and Emerging Media at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, where he is focused on exploring intersectional identities in the U.S. and contemporary Asian diasporic art. He is a founding member of the iLL-Literacy arts collective, and also produces and performs music independently. Adriel frequently travels to different parts of Asia with particular interest in how digital space shapes global communities, and how varying levels of freedom of expression channel artistic political imagination. Adriel can be found across online platforms as @DRZZL.

Anna Kazumi Stahl is a fiction writer and PhD working in literature and critical mixed race studies. Based in Argentina, Stahl is Director of NYU Buenos Aires. Serving on Fulbright and PEN/Argentina, she lectures at MALBA museum and assists in J.M. Coetzee’s UNSAM seminars on Literatures of the Southern Hemisphere.

Steven Wong is the Senior Curator at the Chinese American Museum based in Los Angeles.  Mr. Wong is an artist, contemporary art curator and the curator of history at the museum.  His academic interests include Chinese transnational labor migration from the 1850-1930, the role of Orientalism in the construction of Chinatowns and tourist economies, the post-1965 Chinese American middle-class in the United states and the formation of ethnoburbs.  In 2012, he co-curated an exhibition for the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980  titled Breaking Ground: Chinese American Architects in Los Angeles at CAM which was the first comprehensive exhibit about a group of pioneering Chinese American architects whose designs continue to influence the landscape of Southern California.  He recently co-curated Origins: The Birth and Rise of Chinese American Communities in Los Angeles which is the largest permanent exhibition on the West Coast about the settlement of Chinese immigrants in Southern California from the 19th Century to the present day.  Furthermore, he curated a contemporary art exhibition titled (de)Constructing Chinatown which opened the door to local artists to re-imagine one of the oldest communities in Los Angeles through multimedia forms.  Mr. Wong holds a Masters in Asian American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles (1998) and a Master in Fine Arts from the University of California (2000).

 

apa_identity_vertical_blackThe Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU is the institutional sponsor of DAAN

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DAAN at College Art Association — Save the date!

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DAAN at College Art Association — Save the date!

Please save the dates to come to the DAAN business meeting and panel at the annual conference taking place in Washington DC:

Diasporic Asian Art Network Business Meeting:
PLEASE NOTE DATE/PLACE CHANGE!! — NEW INFO:
Thursday, February 4, 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel
Room: Wilson Room B
Learn more about DAAN and upcoming projects from members and network with colleagues. We will be discussing the upcoming DAAN panel in 2017 as well as looking for a new Midwest Regional Representative and Newsletter Editor. If you are interested in any of these positions, please email achang@nyu.edu.

Members will gather for dinner at an area restaurant following the meeting. Members, if there are specific items you would like to add to the agenda or if you would like to RSVP for the dinner please email: achang@nyu.edu.
UPDATE: The DAAN dinner will take place at 7h30pm at Kramer Books Afterwords Cafe:
1517 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036; Tel. (202) 387-3825

Please join us!

Diasporic Asian Art Network Panel Session:
Saturday, February 6, 12:30 PM – 2:00 PM
Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel
Room: Washington 5, Exhibition Level
Panel title: Asian Latino Art and Visual Cultures: Current Scholarship and Institutional Practices
Panelists:
Steven Wong
Senior Curator, Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles
Lawrence-Minh Bùi Davis
Initiative Coordinator, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
Anna Kazumi Stahl
Director, Global Program, NYU Buenos Aires
Chair: Alexandra Chang, NYU A/P/A Institute

This panel on Asian Latino art and visual cultures will range from historic to contemporary art and present some current scholarship on mobilities of images, goods, people, and ideas on the envisioning of Asia in Latin America as well as art practice. The panel will also include current projects from community-based and national-based institutions, the Chinese American Museum in LA and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC and the Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas journal.

Members! If you are presenting a panel or event at CAA, please email achang@nyu.edu the title/time/date/place/additional info so that we can let the membership know–thanks!

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Museum of Modern Art for #WikiAPA — a social evening of Wikipedia editing, dedicated to creating, updating, and improving articles about Asian Pacific American art and artists

http://www.eventbrite.com/e/wikiapa-edit-a-thon-tickets-17974764003

Presented by the Museum of Modern Art in collaboration with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center and Wikimedia NYC. Co-sponsored by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU.

Join us at the Museum of Modern Art for #WikiAPA, a social evening of Wikipedia editing, dedicated to creating, updating, and improving articles about Asian Pacific American art and artists. Hosted at the Museum of Modern Art library in collaboration with the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center and Wikimedia NYC, this meetup will focus on unearthing information about a creatively-rich community that has historically been overlooked.

All are invited, with no specialized knowledge of the subject or Wikipedia editing experience required. Please bring your laptop and power cord; we will have provide research resources, WiFi, and a list of suggested topics on hand. Come early to see Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971 during its final week.

The event kicks off a month-long series of #WikiAPA meetups across the US. For more information about the #WikiAPA series, please visit smithsonianapa.org/wiki or follow#WikiAPA on Twitter.

Admission to the edit-a-thon is free, but please RSVP.

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Agree or Disagree: There Is Such a Thing as a Hawaiʻi Sense of Place

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Agree or Disagree: There Is Such a Thing as a Hawaiʻi Sense of Place

Monday, July 6, 6:00 PM7:30 PM

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An Artist Panel Discussion featuring Kaili Chun, Chae Ho Lee, Kalani Largusa, Keith Tallett. Moderated by Trisha Lagaso Goldberg.

Each of the panelists Kaili Chun, Chae Ho Lee, Kalani Largusa, and Keith Tallett will offer insight into their individual practice with an aim to generate a productive dialogue on how select artists of Hawaiʻi conceptualize the notion of place. Artists are asked to consider the popular notion of “A Hawai‘i Sense of Place” as a departure point for discussion.

This panel will engage in discussion of place, placemaking, and will be moderated by curator and artist, Trisha Lagaso Goldberg.

RSVP details forthcoming.

Kaili Chun, “Nau Ka Wae (The Choice Belongs to You)," installation view, Honolulu Museum of Art (formerly Honolulu Academy of Arts), 2006, image courtesy of Honolulu Museum of Art 

Kaili Chun is a sculptor and installation artist who negotiates ideas of containment and exposure, agency and restraint. Process and materials transform physical spaces into unique environments commenting on contemporary issues in her work. She often constructs narratives through symbols and objects that address the impact of historical events on the present day. Organic elements are sometimes included in her pieces, and the changes they undergo during the course of an exhibition metaphorically reference the nature of culture as an evolutionary process. Chun’s diverse training includes receiving her Bachelor’s in Architecture from Princeton University, during which time she also studied with renown ceramicist Toshiko Takaezu; an MFA from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa; and an apprenticeship with master canoe builder and woodworker Wright Elemakule Bowman, Sr. Numerous museums and galleries such as the University of Alaska Museum; Linden Museum Stuttgart in Germany; Museum of Art & Design, New York; Sacred Circle Gallery, Washington; The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu; and the Honolulu Museum of Art have exhibited Chun’s installations. Kaili has received a number of significant visual art awards. She was awarded the 2014 Native Arts & Cultures Foundation Artist Fellowship; in 2010 she received the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant and in 2008 participated in the Artist Residency at the Santa Fe Art Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Chun received the Catherine E.B. Cox Award for Excellence in the Visual Arts (2006) from the Honolulu Academy of Arts, which culminated in the solo exhibition, “Nau ka wae, The Choice Belongs to You.” Her work is included in many private and institutional collections in Hawai‘i and Germany.

Chae Ho Lee, "Sanborn," image courtesy of the artist 

Chae Ho Lee’s work spans advertising, exhibition, identity, lettering, publication and web design. He has worked for a number of prestigious advertising agencies and design studios in the Pacific Rim, New York City and Dubai. He has lived in the Middle East for over 6 years teaching and directing design programs at several leading academic institutions in the region. He has exhibited his work internationally and published extensively for several leading design journals and publications. Lee was awarded the university’s Regents’ medal for excellence in teaching in 2011.

N. Trisha Lagaso Goldberg is an Aiea-based arts worker, independent curator, public art administrator, and artist. From 1991 to 2004, Trisha was active in the San Francisco Bay Area where she earned degrees from the San Francisco Art Institute and San Francisco State University and worked with such organizations as SFMOMA, SFSU Fine Arts Gallery, Southern Exposure, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. Trisha has lived and worked on O‘ahu, the island of her birth, since 2005. She is a public art Project Manager for the Art in Public Places Program at the Hawai‘i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts, and manager of the Artists in Residence Program. She’s curated and organized exhibitions and public programs for museums and art-run spaces throughout Honolulu. Her artwork has been exhibited at the Honolulu Contemporary Museum and the Museum of Craft and Folk Art in San Francisco, and has been featured in the Wallpaper* City Guide Honolulu, FLUX Hawaii magazine, and the Honolulu Star Advertiser.

Kalani Largusa, "Where I wait for you," 48' x 60", oil and mixed media on canvas, 2015, image courtesy of the artist 

Kalani Largusa is from Kapahi, Kaua‘i. He entered the University of Hawai‘i’s MFA program in the fall of 2013.  He previously studied drawing and illustration at the California College of Arts [CCA] and received his BFA in painting studio practice from the School of Art Institute of Chicago in 2013.  He was a San Diego Comic Convention invitee to the Comic Scholar Poster Session, a guest speaker at San Francisco’s WonderCon, and the Chicago Comic and Entertainment Expo to present his paper entitled “The significance of Kato and the evolution of his role as the Green Hornets sidekick.” Kalani was also a feature artist in Chicago’s Next Generation, 18th annual Asian American Showcase in 2013. His work centers on process of painting filtered through Polynesian tattoo symbolism and methodology, and “almost western” comic book iconography. Whether sharp detailed draftsmanship, mixed-media mashup journaling, or large non-representational paintings, Largusa’s work is ultimately an investigation of marks. He is currently represented by Gallery HNL and will be one of the artists featured in the gallery’s group show expected in late November of this year.

Keith Tallett, "Poi Shaka - after Rap, (poi dog series)," 2013, image courtesy of the artist

Keith Tallett is a Hawai‘i-based mixed media artist whose work utilizes humor & irony to create a dialogue between cultural practices, local knowledge systems and popular culture. Often focusing on commodity fetishism, privatization of land ownership and the accumulation of cultural capital, the work takes form in paintings, drawings, photography, installation and sculpture. Most recently Keith has developed a collaborative practice with his wife, artist Sally Lundburg, under the name Les Filter Feeders. Together they participated in the Honolulu residency, Present Project in 2014, where they created a large-scale installation inspired by the structures, language, and tools of shelter and survival. Keith has exhibited at such venues as the Honolulu Museum of Art, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, Track 16 Gallery in Los Angeles, and Franklin Parrasch Gallery in New York. He was included in the Artists of Hawai‘i 2011 exhibition at the Honolulu Museum of Art, where he received the Jean Charlot Foundation Award for Excellence and in 2012, was awarded a Joan Mitchell Foundation Sculptor and Painter Grant. His forthcoming projects include The Rat and The Octopus, at the Maui Arts and Cultural Center in 2016. Keith’s professional experience includes being a juror for the 2015 International Schaefer Portrait Challenge, lecturing at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Art Department from 2004 – 2011, and being a founding member of AGGROculture, a Hawaiʻi based art collective. Keith has an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute and a BA from the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. www.keithtallett.com www.lesfilterfeeders.com

This artist panel is a part of the 2015 Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange (GAX) initiatives. 2105 GAX thanks the support of NYU Office of the Provost Global Research Initiatives and major airline sponsor Hawaiian Airlines

 

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2015 GAX Colloquium: Transpacific Art Circulations / Islands

2015 GAX Colloquium: Transpacific Art Circulations / Islands

Tuesday, July 7, 1:00 PM5:00 PM

Presented by the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Department of Art and Art History and Art Gallery and Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program in collaboration with the Asian/Pacific American Institute at NYU as an initiative of the 2015 Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange (GAX)

The colloquium will be discussing Transpacific circulations of art and practice, drawing on presentations by artists engaging in transpacific and transnational diasporic practice, curators involved in framings of the Asia/Pacific within the global and scholars involved in research and discourse building within the field. The colloquium is free and open to the public and hopes to create discussion on existing nodes of art historical discourse and how Transpacific framings allow for possible expanded ways of exploring work and practice.

RSVP here.

1:00PM
Welcome:
Rod Bengston, Director, The Art Gallery at University of Hawai‘i
Introductory Remarks:
Alexandra Chang, NYU Asian/Pacific/American Institute / Margo Machida, University of Connecticut, Storrs

1:15-2:55PM
Panel 1: Transpacific Circulations

Eating in Public (Gaye Chan and Nandita Sharma), Honolulu
Yuki Kihara, Interdisciplinary Artist, Samoa and New Zealand
Trisha Lagaso Goldberg, Independent Curator and Commissions Project Manager, Hawai‘i State Foundation on Arts and Cultures
John Tain, Curator, Getty Research Institute
Fumio Nanjo, Director, Mori Art Museum

Discussants:

David Goldberg, Art and Cultural Critic, Lead Developer and Project Coordinator for the UH Mānoa Digital Arts and Humanities Initiative
Tom Looser, East Asian Studies, New York University
Moderator: Karen Kosasa, Museum Studies, University of Hawai‘i

2:55-4:25PM
Panel 2: Island Modernism and Global Flows

Introduction and panel moderator: Mark Johnson, Professor and Gallery Director, San Francisco State University
Jay Jensen, Curator of Contemporary Art, Honolulu Museum of Art
Tom Wolf, Professor, Bard College
Discussant: Marcia Morse, Artist and Independent Art Critic and Curator

4:25-4:55PM
In Conversation: Satoru Abe and John Koga, Artists, Honolulu

4:55-5PM
Closing Remarks

Art and Art History Departments at University of Hawai‘i
The Art Gallery at University of Hawai‘i
Museum Studies Graduate Certificate Program at University of Hawai‘i

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Special thanks to the support of
NYU’s Office of the Provost Global Research Initiatives

 

Major Travel Sponsor Hawaiian Airlines
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2015 GAX Symposium: GLOBAL ASIAS | ART

SYMPOSIUM OUTLINE

Friday, June 26, 2015 and Saturday, June 27, 2015

 

Day 1: Friday, June 26, 2015, 9:30AM-5PM

Venue: Roppongi Academy Hills (Mori Tower 49F)

Organized by: Mori Art Museum and New York University Asian/Pacific/American Institute Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange

In cooperation with: Academy Hills, University of Tokyo

Free and open to the public. RSVP required.

For questions, please contact Public Programs at the Mori Art Museum: ppevent-mam@mori.co.jp

 

Day 2: Saturday, June 27, 2015 9:30AM-6PM

Venue: The University of Tokyo Komaba Campus, Auditorium, Administration Office Bldg (3F)

Organized by: Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS), The University of Tokyo

In collaboration with: Mori Art Museum and New York University Asian/Pacific/American Institute Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange

Free and open to the public. No RSVP required. Seating on a first-come basis.

For questions, please contact Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS), The University of Tokyo: project1@ihs.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

 

SCHEDULE

Day 1, Friday, June 26, 2015:

Roppongi Academy Hills, Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 49F, Auditorium

9AM Registration

9:30-10AM Introduction

Nanjo Fumio, Director, Mori Art Museum

Alexandra Chang, NYU, Asian/Pacific/American Institute

Thomas Looser, NYU, East Asian Studies

 

10AM-12PM Session 1: From Global Toward the International

Patrick Flores, Professor, University of the Philippines

Being International

Kim Sunjung, Director, Asian Culture Information Agency, Asian Cultural Complex

MoMA’s International Program and its changing relationship with Asia

Jay Levenson, Director, International Program, Museum of Modern Art

Nanjo Fumio, Director, Mori Art Museum

Oscar Ho, Professor, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Discussant:

Deity, Pop Culture and the Umbrella Movement

John Tain, Curator, Getty Research Institute

Introductory talk and moderated by Kataoka Mami, Chief Curator, Mori Art Museum

 

12-1PM ランチ _Lunch

 

1-1:40PM 基調講演:アジアン・アメリカン・アート、汎太平洋地域のアート _

Keynote: On Asian American and Transpacific Art

Margo Machida, Professor, University of Connecticut, Storrs, 30 min

Q&A moderated by Thomas Looser, Associate Professor, New York University

 

1:40-5PM Panel 2: Trajectories of Asian diasporic scholarship and practice

Yuki Kihara, Interdisciplinary Artist, Samoa and New Zealand

Tomie Arai, Artist, New York

Oscar Oiwa, Artist, New York and São Paulo

Kuniyoshi, Noguchi and Ishigaki: Japanese Artists in New York in the 1930s

Tom Wolf, Professor, Bard College

Discussants:

Alice Ming Wai Jim, Associate Professor, Concordia University

Anna Kazumi Stahl, Director, NYU-Buenos Aires

Introductory talk and moderated by Alexandra Chang, Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs, NYU Asian/Pacific/American Institute

 

DAY 2, Saturday, June 27, 2015: IMAGINING ASIAN ART IN GLOBAL ASIAS

The University of Tokyo Komaba Campus, Auditorium, Administration Office Bldg (3F)

This symposium, organized by the University of Tokyo’s Integrated Human Sciences for Cultural Diversity Program, aims to interrogate the notion of Global Asias and the contemporary situation of Asian art in and beyond geographical Asia.

The idea of Global Asias, which refers to the global dislocation, relocation, and transformation of goods, ideas, and people originating in Asia, calls attention to transnational conflict and negotiation at multiple intersecting levels. It is concerned with relationships not only between indigenous cultures inside Asia, but also between Asian-derived cultures outside of Asia. Global Asias looks, for example, not only at the relationship between Japan and the United States or Japan and Brazil, but also the relationship between Japanese-American and Japanese-Brazilian.

The symposium proposes to focus specifically on contemporary art practices in relationship to the global diffusion and transformation of Asian art and culture. We would like to explore how local art history in Asian countries is reconfigured by, and also reconfigures, the globalization of Asian art and its discourses. We are also interested in examining how art practices within a given country relate to art practices by those who are from that country but live and work elsewhere.

In addition, we would like to consider how the idea of Global Asias, which represents a plural and transnational concept of Asian culture, figures in the processes of globalization that in some way exercise hegemonic effects on local and indigenous art practices. The symposium will also consider global framings in relation to the concept of Global Asias which may include a call back to the international or may examine practices that call upon the global in terms of the planetary.

9:30AM Opening Remarks:

Uchino Tadashi, Professor, Department of Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies, University of Tokyo

Thomas Looser, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, New York University

 

10AM-12PM Panel 1: Beyond Boundaries in East and Southeast Asia

Synthetic Experience in Contemporary Korean Art: The Alternative and Cinematic Medium in the Age of Anxiety and Disaster

Chung Yeon Shim, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and Theory, Hongik University, Seoul

Coordinates of Region, Latitudes of Locality

Patrick D. Flores, Professor, University of the Philippines, Manila

Perception and Distance of the Globalization: How Japanese Contemporary Art Has Been Delivered to New Audience

Kataoka Mami, chief curator at Mori Art Museum, Tokyo

Globalized East and Ecological Globe: Is There a Way for Chinese Art to Take?

Wang Chunchen, Associate Professor, Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing

Discussants:

Inaga Shigemi, Professor, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto

Miriam Wattles, Associate Professor, History of Art and Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara

Moderator:

Kajiya Kenji, Associate Professor, Archival Research Center, Kyoto City University of Arts

 

12-1PM Lunch

 

1-3PM Panel 2: Imagining Japan in Contested Sites of Contemporary Art

Hybridity, Precarity and Possibility in Recent Works by Yamashiro Chikako and Soni Kum: “Imagining an Asia, Politics and Art to Come”

Rebecca Jennison, Professor of Humanities, Kyoto Seika University, Kyoto

Global Asias: Diversity of Nipo-Brazilian Artists

Michiko Okano, Professor of the Undergraduate and Graduate Programs of History of Asian Art, Federal University of São Paulo

To the Ubbeboda station: Yoshio Nakajima in Northern Europe

Shimada Yoshiko, visual artist based in Japan

Mahatma Gandhi, Mao Zedong and Nguyen Ngoc Loan executes Viet Cong Captain Nguyen Van Lem: The Asian Images of Morimura Yasumasa, 1991-2010

Ayelet Zohar, Curator and Lecturer, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University

Discussants:

Kuraya Mika, Chief Curator, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

Ido Misato, Visiting Fellow, Department of East Asian Studies, Princeton University

Moderator:

Nakajima Takahiro, Professor, Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, University of Tokyo

 

3:15-5:15PM Panel 3: Localized Mobilities / Mobilized Localities in Transnational Asias

Sociologies of Artistic Consumption and Education

John Clammer, Visiting Professor, United Nations University, Tokyo

Scale Drawing: Contemporary Art and Globalization in South Asia

Sonal Khullar, assistant professor of South Asian art, University of Washington, Seattle

Behind the Waves

Jawshing Arthur Liou, Professor, Indiana University, Bloomington

Art in the Centre of Asia: an Identity Crisis or a Multicultural Modernity?

Yuliya Sorokina, curator, lecturer and writer, based in Almaty, Kazakhstan

Behind the Waves”

 

Discussants:

C.J. Wee Wan-ling, Professor, Division of English, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Imamura Yusaku, Director, Tokyo Wonder Site

Moderator:

Uchino Tadashi

 

5:30-6:30PM Wrap-up Discussion

Kataoka Mami

Thomas Looser

Inaga Shigemi

Uchino Tadashi

Moderator:

Nakajima Takahiro

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http://www.nyu-apastudies.org/2012/event/2015-gax-symposium-global-asias-art/

 

2015 GAX Symposium: GLOBAL ASIAS | ART

Global Art and Diasporic Art in Japan and Asia

Friday, June 26Saturday, June 27

Symposium jointly organized by Mori Art Museum, Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU, and Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS), The University of Tokyo as part of the 2015 Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange initiative (GAX)

This symposium is set in the background of an ongoing investigation under the rubric of Global Asias Art and Visual Cultures, which includes reflections on changing connotations of Asia, the modern and the global with its sets of networked economies and circuits of artistic production and visual flows. The symposium will continue with an evolving awareness of transcultural and transnational mobilities in relation to artistic production, but with a view toward internationalisms and the possibility of new internationalisms—a reexamining of the global, in part through a look at the reinscription of the national and international in the global context, which may also be taken as a push toward local specificities in relation to the global. This is also producing developing practices of global responsibility, including socially engaged and environmentally conscious forms of art practice that point to a planetary ethics of the visual. Thus, participants will cover topics from the national to the global and the planetary, from a history of Asian American and other diasporic Asian art to current global tendencies. Global Asias | Art will engage scholars, arts professionals and artists with a critical look at the field in response to the concept of Global Asias including the conceptual intentionality, possibility and limits of these frameworks.

Image: Chalana (Big) , 2014, oil on canvas, 227 x 333 cm / 90 x 132 inches. Courtesy: Oscar Oiwa Studio NY

 

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Thanks for support of the 2015 Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange initiative by:

 

NYU Office of the Provost Global Research Initiatives

Major Travel Sponsor Hawaiian Airlines

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SYMPOSIUM OUTLINE

Friday, June 26, 2015 and Saturday, June 27, 2015

 

Day 1: Friday, June 26, 2015, 9:30AM-5PM

Venue: Roppongi Academy Hills (Mori Tower 49F)

Organized by: Mori Art Museum and New York University Asian/Pacific/American Institute Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange

In cooperation with: Academy Hills, University of Tokyo

Free and open to the public. RSVP required.

For questions, please contact Public Programs at the Mori Art Museum: ppevent-mam@mori.co.jp

 

Day 2: Saturday, June 27, 2015 9:30AM-6PM

Venue: The University of Tokyo Komaba Campus, Auditorium, Administration Office Bldg (3F)

Organized by: Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS), The University of Tokyo

In collaboration with: Mori Art Museum and New York University Asian/Pacific/American Institute Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange

Free and open to the public. No RSVP required. Seating on a first-come basis.

For questions, please contact Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS), The University of Tokyo: project1@ihs.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

 

SCHEDULE

Day 1, Friday, June 26, 2015:

Roppongi Academy Hills, Roppongi Hills Mori Tower 49F, Auditorium

9AM Registration

9:30-10AM Introduction

Nanjo Fumio, Director, Mori Art Museum

Alexandra Chang, NYU, Asian/Pacific/American Institute

Thomas Looser, NYU, East Asian Studies

 

10AM-12PM Session 1: From Global Toward the International

Patrick Flores, Professor, University of the Philippines

Being International

Kim Sunjung, Director, Asian Culture Information Agency, Asian Cultural Complex

MoMA’s International Program and its changing relationship with Asia

Jay Levenson, Director, International Program, Museum of Modern Art

Nanjo Fumio, Director, Mori Art Museum

Discussants:

Deity, Pop Culture and the Umbrella Movement

Oscar Ho, Professor, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

John Tain, Curator, Getty Research Institute

Introductory talk and moderated by Kataoka Mami, Chief Curator, Mori Art Museum

 

12-1PM ランチ _Lunch

 

1-1:40PM 基調講演:アジアン・アメリカン・アート、汎太平洋地域のアート _

Keynote: On Asian American and Transpacific Art

Margo Machida, Professor, University of Connecticut, Storrs, 30 min

Q&A moderated by Thomas Looser, Associate Professor, New York University

 

1:40-5PM Panel 2: Trajectories of Asian diasporic scholarship and practice

Yuki Kihara, Interdisciplinary Artist, Samoa and New Zealand

Tomie Arai, Artist, New York

Oscar Oiwa, Artist, New York and São Paulo

Kuniyoshi, Noguchi and Ishigaki: Japanese Artists in New York in the 1930s

Tom Wolf, Professor, Bard College

Discussants:

Alice Ming Wai Jim, Associate Professor, Concordia University

Anna Kazumi Stahl, Director, NYU-Buenos Aires

Introductory talk and moderated by Alexandra Chang, Curator of Special Projects and Director of Global Arts Programs, NYU Asian/Pacific/American Institute

 

DAY 2, Saturday, June 27, 2015: IMAGINING ASIAN ART IN GLOBAL ASIAS

The University of Tokyo Komaba Campus, Auditorium, Administration Office Bldg (3F)

This symposium, organized by the University of Tokyo’s Integrated Human Sciences for Cultural Diversity Program, aims to interrogate the notion of Global Asias and the contemporary situation of Asian art in and beyond geographical Asia.

The idea of Global Asias, which refers to the global dislocation, relocation, and transformation of goods, ideas, and people originating in Asia, calls attention to transnational conflict and negotiation at multiple intersecting levels. It is concerned with relationships not only between indigenous cultures inside Asia, but also between Asian-derived cultures outside of Asia. Global Asias looks, for example, not only at the relationship between Japan and the United States or Japan and Brazil, but also the relationship between Japanese-American and Japanese-Brazilian.

The symposium proposes to focus specifically on contemporary art practices in relationship to the global diffusion and transformation of Asian art and culture. We would like to explore how local art history in Asian countries is reconfigured by, and also reconfigures, the globalization of Asian art and its discourses. We are also interested in examining how art practices within a given country relate to art practices by those who are from that country but live and work elsewhere.

In addition, we would like to consider how the idea of Global Asias, which represents a plural and transnational concept of Asian culture, figures in the processes of globalization that in some way exercise hegemonic effects on local and indigenous art practices. The symposium will also consider global framings in relation to the concept of Global Asias which may include a call back to the international or may examine practices that call upon the global in terms of the planetary.

9:30AM Opening Remarks:

Uchino Tadashi, Professor, Department of Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies, University of Tokyo

Thomas Looser, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, New York University

 

10AM-12PM Panel 1: Beyond Boundaries in East and Southeast Asia

Synthetic Experience in Contemporary Korean Art: The Alternative and Cinematic Medium in the Age of Anxiety and Disaster

Chung Yeon Shim, Associate Professor, Department of Art History and Theory, Hongik University, Seoul

Coordinates of Region, Latitudes of Locality

Patrick D. Flores, Professor, University of the Philippines, Manila

Perception and Distance of the Globalization: How Japanese Contemporary Art Has Been Delivered to New Audience

Kataoka Mami, chief curator at Mori Art Museum, Tokyo

Globalized East and Ecological Globe: Is There a Way for Chinese Art to Take?

Wang Chunchen, Associate Professor, Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing

Discussants:

Inaga Shigemi, Professor, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, Kyoto

Miriam Wattles, Associate Professor, History of Art and Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara

Moderator:

Kajiya Kenji, Associate Professor, Archival Research Center, Kyoto City University of Arts

 

12-1PM Lunch

 

1-3PM Panel 2: Imagining Japan in Contested Sites of Contemporary Art

Hybridity, Precarity and Possibility in Recent Works by Yamashiro Chikako and Soni Kum: “Imagining an Asia, Politics and Art to Come”

Rebecca Jennison, Professor of Humanities, Kyoto Seika University, Kyoto

Global Asias: Diversity of Nipo-Brazilian Artists

Michiko Okano, Professor of the Undergraduate and Graduate Programs of History of Asian Art, Federal University of São Paulo

To the Ubbeboda station: Yoshio Nakajima in Northern Europe

Shimada Yoshiko, visual artist based in Japan

Mahatma Gandhi, Mao Zedong and Nguyen Ngoc Loan executes Viet Cong Captain Nguyen Van Lem: The Asian Images of Morimura Yasumasa, 1991-2010

Ayelet Zohar, Curator and Lecturer, Department of Art History, Tel Aviv University

Discussants:

Kuraya Mika, Chief Curator, National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo

Ido Misato, Visiting Fellow, Department of East Asian Studies, Princeton University

Moderator:

Nakajima Takahiro, Professor, Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, University of Tokyo

 

3:15-5:15PM Panel 3: Localized Mobilities / Mobilized Localities in Transnational Asias

Sociologies of Artistic Consumption and Education

John Clammer, Visiting Professor, United Nations University, Tokyo

Scale Drawing: Contemporary Art and Globalization in South Asia

Sonal Khullar, assistant professor of South Asian art, University of Washington, Seattle

Behind the Waves

Jawshing Arthur Liou, Professor, Indiana University, Bloomington

Art in the Centre of Asia: an Identity Crisis or a Multicultural Modernity?

Yuliya Sorokina, curator, lecturer and writer, based in Almaty, Kazakhstan

Behind the Waves”

 

Discussants:

C.J. Wee Wan-ling, Professor, Division of English, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Imamura Yusaku, Director, Tokyo Wonder Site

Moderator:

Uchino Tadashi

 

5:30-6:30PM Wrap-up Discussion

Kataoka Mami

Thomas Looser

Inaga Shigemi

Uchino Tadashi

Moderator:

Nakajima Takahiro

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Call for Submissions: Erasing Borders: Twelfth Annual IAAC Exhibition of Contemporary Indian Art of the Diaspora 2015

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
Erasing Borders: Twelfth Annual
IAAC Exhibition of Contemporary Indian Art of the Diaspora 2015
Deadline: October 15, 2014The Indo American Arts Council is delighted to announce its Call for Submissions for the Erasing Borders Exhibition of Contemporary Indian Art of the Diaspora 2015 Curated by Vijay Kumar, Erasing Borders explores the contributions of artists whose origins can be traced to the Indian Subcontinent. The exhibition travels to several key galleries and museums in North America from February – December each year. Please visit www.iaac.us

CRITERIA:

  • Artwork submitted must have been completed within the last two years
  • All visual art genres will be considered
  • Works in progress will be considered with attached explanations
  • Artists living in North America who have their origins in the Indian Subcontinent
  • All submissions must be received by the deadline of October 15, 2014
  • Works not yet exhibited are highly recommended
  • Collaborative works will also be considered

SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

  • (Artwork will not be considered if we have not received all the requested materials below)
  • All information must be on a CD, labeled with artist’s Name, E-mail and Phone Number
  • The CD must include high resolution images (at least 1500 x 2100 pixels 300dpi) of the artwork (the images should not be over 2 MB)
  • All images must include: Title, Size, Medium, Price, year completed.
  • The CD to also include a document containing artist’s Full Name, E-mail, Web Address, Mailing Address and Phone Number
  • Artist’s Photograph (at least 1200 x 1200 pixels, 300 dpi)
  • Artist Statement
  • Resume
  • Submission fee: $20
  • All information should be in the word file format and not pdf.

Submission deadline: October 15, 2014
Participating artists for 2015 will be announced December 2014

Please send all submissions to:
Erasing Borders 2015
Indo-American Arts Council Inc
517 East 87th Street, Suite 1B
New York, NY 10128
Email: ebart.iaac@gmail.com

* Application Fee $20
Registration fee may be through Pay pal (using any credit card) Click here >> or via cheque to the address above.
The Indo-American Arts Council is a 501 ©3 not-for-profit secular arts organization passionately dedicated to promoting, showcasing and building an awareness of artists of Indian origin in the performing arts, visual arts, literary arts and folk arts. For information please visitwww.iaac.us.Indo-American Arts Council Inc. 517 East 87th St, Suite 1B, New York, NY 10128. Phone: 212 594 3685. Web:www.iaac.us

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The Asian Women Giving Circle — Request for Proposals for its Women, Arts & Activism Fund — deadline MARCH 7!

http://forwomen.org/content/147/en/donor-advised-funds-asian-women-giving-circle

The Asian Women Giving Circle, a donor advised fund of the Ms. Foundation for Women, is pleased to announce a Request for Proposals for its Women, Arts & Activism Fund. The deadline for submitting a proposal is this Friday, March 7, 2014 at 5pm (Eastern Standard Time).

Through this RFP, the Asian Women Giving Circle seeks to support Asian American women-led projects that use the tools of culture, the arts and education to raise awareness and catalyze action around critical issues that impact Asian American communities.

For the complete RFP and application materials, please visit: Ms. Foundation for Women’s website.

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