Tag Archives: art history

Oil & Water Symposium at Museum of Chinese in America, NYC April 27th

Website: http://www.mocanyc.org/visit/events/oil_water_symposium
Title: Oil & Water Symposium
Date: Sun, Apr 27, 2014 from 10am – 4pm
Location: Museum of China in America, 215 Centre Street New York, NY 10013

Admission: $15/Adults; $10/MOCA Members, Students, and Seniors

Advanced reservation required:
RSVP: Call now: 212-619-4785 or email: programs@mocanyc.org

The Museum of Chinese in America in New York City (MOCA) will host a scholarly symposium in conjunction with MOCA’s upcoming exhibition Oil & Water: Reinterpreting Ink, opening April 24th. The exhibition will feature the work of three renowned Chinese contemporary artists: Qiu Deshu, Wei Jia, and Zhang Hongtu.

This symposium is composed of experts in the field of Chinese and American art history who will discuss the trajectory of Chinese ink art from traditional landscape painting and calligraphy to the creative reinterpretation of these historic models, reflecting on the social, political and artistic ramifications of their development. The dialogues will unpack the intellectual importance of the ever-developing ink genre and the role these artists play in shaping contemporary art in New York.

SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM:

• 10:00 – 10:30AM
Welcome and Introduction by Herb Tam, Carolyn Hsu-Balcer, and Michelle Loh

• 10:30AM – 11:30AM
Let Hundred Flowers Bloom: Contemporary Ink in the 21st Century by Julia F. Andrews , Kuiyi Shen, and Melissa Chiu
Moderate by John Rajchman

• 11:30AM – 12:00PM
Artist Interview: Wei Jia and Robert C. Morgan

• 12:00AM – 12:30PM
Artist Interview: Zhang Hongtu and Richard Vine

12:30PM – 1:30PM Lunch Break

• 1:30PM – 2:30PM The Emergence of Asian Art and Asian American Art in the 20th Century

What is Asian, what is American? by Lilly Wei, Aileen Wang (1:30PM – 2:00PM)

How Does Political Evolution and Artistic Revolution in China and America Shape the Development of Asian/American Art by Jerome Cohen (2:00PM – 2:30PM)

• 2:30PM – 3:00PM
Artist Interview: Qiu Deshu and Joan Cohen

3:00PM – 4:00PM Gallery Tour

Panelists include Julia Andrews (Professor, Department of the History of Art, Ohio State University), Carolyn Hsu-Balcer, Jerome Cohen (Professor of Law at New York University School of Law), Melissa Chiu (Director, Asia Society Musuem), Qiu Deshu (featured artist), Michelle Loh (Art Consultant; Director, Athena Art Advisory), Robert C. Morgan (Art Critic and Artist; Professor Emeritus, Art History, Rochester Institute of Technology), John Rajchman (Director, the Modern Art M.A. Program, Columbia University), Kuiyi Shen (Professor, Asian Art History, Theory and Criticism, University of California, San Diego), Herb Tam (Curator, MOCA), Joan Lebold Cohen, Richard Vine (Managing Editor, Art in America), Aileen Wang (Assistant Professor, Art History and Museum Studies, LIU Post), Lilly Wei (art critic and independent curator), Wei Jia (featured artist), and Zhang Hongtu (featured artist).

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CFP for CAA 2013: Subaltern Rising: Racialization and Visual Culture in the Wake of Independence

CFP: Subaltern Rising: Racialization and Visual Culture in the Wake of Independence
Association for Critical Race Art History (ACRAH) Sponsored Session
College Art Association Annual Conference
New York, February 13-16, 2013

Chair: José Esteban Muñoz, New York University

The years 2012 and 2013 mark fifty years of independence for dozens of former colonies across
the globe. This panel is dedicated to the consideration of art and other forms of expressive
culture at the moment of historical transition, especially as it was evident in the reconfigured
racialization of citizens, economies, geographies, and political systems.

Key regions of post-coloniality include the Caribbean, South America, Africa, Asia, Australia,
and the Pacific Islands. Commissioned public monuments and state architecture; redrawn cities,
renamed streets and other public spaces; and the establishment of cultural institutions—including
national museums and libraries—were acts of autonomy in newly independent Jamaica, Trinidad
& Tobago, Algeria, and Western Samoa (all 1962), and elsewhere.

How was the burst of creativity among artists producing work for the state, reorganized
marketplaces and other commercial venues, performance, and national pageants inevitably
informed by the preceding colonial order? Which post-colonial strategies reflect symbolic and
stylistic borrowings from the language of European modernism in general?

What comparisons and contrasts can be made with post-colonial art produced earlier in short
India and Pakistan (1947); Sri Lanka (1948); Laos (1949); Cambodia (1953); Tunisia, Morocco,
Ghana, and Sudan (1956)? How do all these mid-twentieth century breaks from colonial
and imperial rule influence subsequent visual and cultural programs in the Bahamas (1971),
Suriname (1973), Papua New Guinea (1975), the Panama Canal Zone (1979), Australia and New
Zealand (1986), and Eritrea (1993)?

Please submit a 350-word preliminary abstract and short CV (2 page maximum) in one MSWord
or PDF file attachment to: acrah@ymail.com by May 11, 2012. Email submissions with one
attachment only.

CAA membership is NOT required to participate in or attend the session.

ASSOCIATION FOR CRITICAL RACE ART HISTORY
acrah@ymail.com | Facebook <http://www.facebook.com/acrah>
| The Grapevine <http://acrah.wordpress.com>

Download a pdf of the CFP here: CFP_ACRAH

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