Tag Archives: Brett Graham

BINDING & LOOPING : TRANSFER OF PRESENCE IN CONTEMPORARY PACIFIC ART at University of Hawai’i, Manoa

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BINDING & LOOPING : TRANSFER OF PRESENCE IN CONTEMPORARY PACIFIC ART 
October 5 – December 5, 2014University of Hawai’i, Manoa
The Department of Art and Art History
Art Gallery

Binding and Looping: Transfer of Presence in Contemporary Pacific Artbrings together artists from Hawai‘i and the Pacific for whom fiber and concepts of binding are both a respected tradition and an inspiration for contemporary art. In their individual ways, these artists consider their indigenous binding and looping customs and at the same time incorporate different media to create new works in sculpture, printmaking, photography, painting, and video. The exhibition includes work by artists from Hawai‘i, Tonga, New Zealand, Cook Islands, Papua New Guinea, and Micronesia. Dr.Deborah Waite, professor of Pacific art history at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, is the curator. The artists include: Bernice AkamineMaile Andrade, Kaili Chun, Brett Graham, Patsy Herman, Angelina Jilak, Florence Jaukae, Noelle Kahanu, Cathy Kata, Maria Kenda, Kapulani Landgraf, Marques Marzan, Moana Nepia, Ani O’Neill, Su‘a Sulu‘ape Petelo Alaiva‘a, Lisa ReihanaFilipe Tohi, Maika‘i Tubbs, Michel TufferySheyne Tuffery, Christina Wirihana.

PUBLIC EVENTS (all events are free)

Bernice AkamineFriday, December 5

      time to be announced (Art Gallery)
      Closing Performance /

Moana NepiaEvents are subject to change without notice.

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Between Savage and Civilized: Negotiating a Space for Indigenous Art in the 21st Century — at NYU


Between Savage and Civilized: Negotiating a Space for Indigenous Art in the 21st Century
Co-presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU and NYU Draper Program

Tuesday, April 29, 2014
6-8PM

A/P/A Institute at NYU
8 Washington Mews

What does it mean to be an “Indigenous artist” working between his/her own community and the contemporary global art world? To what degree has the global art world embraced the “tribal”, and the “tribal” interfaced with western art? These are some of the questions Brett Graham will explore, drawing from examples in his own work, and recent indigenous art exhibitions such as Sakahan: International Indigenous Art. Mario Caro (Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow, NYU Draper Program) provides an introduction.

DETAILS + RSVP

Image credit: Jennifer French.

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