Tag Archives: China

Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World book launch and panel at Queens Museum of Art

http://www.queensmuseum.org/events/zhang-hongtu-expanding-visions-of-a-shrinking-world

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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World
Book Launch and Panel Discussion

Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World is edited  by Luchia Meihua Lee, guest curator of Zhang Hongtu, and Jerome Silbergeld. Twelve leading art experts, art historians, and critics have reviewed the life, career, and artistic development of New York based Chinese artist Zhang Hongtu. Please join us for a conversation about the book and exhibition with Jerome Silbergeld and contributors Eugenie Tsai and Lilly Wei.

A pioneer in contemporary Chinese art, Zhang created the first example of “China Pop” art, and his oeuvre is as diverse, intellectually complex, and engaging as it is entertaining. From painting and sculpture to computer generated works and multimedia projects, Zhang’s art is equally rich in terms of China’s history and its current events, containing profound reflections on China’s oldest cultural habits and contemporary preoccupations. He provides a model of cross-cultural interaction designed to make Asian and Western audiences look more closely at each other and at themselves to recognize the beliefs they hold and the unexamined values they adhere to.

From his early work in China during the Cultural Revolution to his decades as an artist in New York, Zhang reflects the complex attitudes of a scholar-artist toward modernity, as well as toward Asian and Western societies and himself.  Placing Zhang in the context of his cultural milieu both in China and in the Chinese immigrant artist community in America, this volume’s contributors examine his adaptations of classic art to reflect a contemporary sensibility, his relation to Cubism and Social Realism, his collaboration with the celebrated fashion designer Vivienne Tam, and his visual critique of China’s current environmental crisis.

Jerome Silbergeld is the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History at Princeton University and director of Princeton’s Tang Center for East Asian Art. A specialist in Song-Yuan period painting, he has published more than eighty books, catalogues, articles, and book chapters on topics in traditional and contemporary Chinese painting, traditional architecture and gardens, cinema and photography. He has also curated and co-curated eight exhibitions, including the first major solo exhibition in America by a Chinese artist, in 1988. His books on cinema and photography include China Into Film, Hitchcock with a Chinese Face, and Humanism in China. On contemporary art, his books includeContradictions: Artistic Life, the Socialist State, and the Chinese Painter Li Huasheng, the first extensive study of any PRC artist, which became a New York Times notable book of the year in 1993; Outside In, on the globalization and loss of “Chineseness” of Chinese art; and ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art.

Eugenie Tsai has been John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum since 2007. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P.S.1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University

Lilly Wei is a New York-based independent curator and critic whose focus is global contemporary art. She has written regularly for Art in America since 1984 and is a contributing editor at ARTnews and  formerly one at Art Asia Pacific.  Among other national and international publications, Wei has also written for Art & Australia, Asian Art News, Sanat Dünyamiz, Art Papers, Sculpture Magazine, Studio International, Tema Celeste, Flash Art, Art Press, and Art and Auction, and has frequently reported on international biennials such as those of Venice, Sydney, Cairo, Athens, Reykjavik, Shenzhen and Hong Kong and international exhibitions such as Documenta and Sonsbeek, the sculpture international in the Netherlands.  She has been the author of many exhibition catalogues and brochures on contemporary art, including publications for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Knoedler, Marlborough and Pace Galleries, New York, NY. She has curated numerous exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Asia. Two of her most recent exhibitions were “The Museum Imagined” at Danese/Corey, New York, NY, and “Uncanny/Figure” at Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs.  Wei lectures on critical and curatorial practices and serves on numerous advisory committees and review panels.  She was born in Chengdu, China and has an MA in art history from Columbia University, New York.

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Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong at Museum of Chinese in America, NYC

http://www.mocanyc.org/exhibitions/water_to_paper_paint_to_sky_the_art_of_tyrus_wong

Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong

March 26, 2015 – September 13, 2015

CURATORS’ TOUR
SECOND AND FOURTH THURSDAYS 

APRIL 9 – SEPTEMBER 10 | 6:30 PM

Explore Tyrus Wong’s craft, as well as lasting influence of his artistic vision and style. Free with admission!

CLICK HERE FOR CURATORS’ TOUR SCHEDULE

In celebration of the Museum’s 35th anniversary this spring, MOCA is proud to present Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong. Celebrated painter, muralist, kite-maker, lithographer and calligrapher, Tyrus Wong is one of the greatest Chinese American artists of the 20th century. This highly anticipated exhibition showcases his extraordinary body of work including Disney’s iconic American children’s classic, Bambi. Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong is organized by The Walt Disney Family Museum, San Francisco, CA.

This retrospective exhibition features Wong’s extensive body of work which includes his paintings, hand-painted ceramics, original greeting cards, works on paper, and latest kite creations. It was the ethereal beauty of Wong’s Eastern influenced paintings, his sense of color, richness, and imagination that caught Walt Disney’s eye and became the inspiration for the animated feature Bambi (1942). Wong’s singular vision and impressionistic art influenced the groundbreaking movie’s overall visual style and changed the way animation art was presented.

Arriving in the United States with his father in 1919 from the Toishan district in Guangdong, China, Wong was initially detained in Angel Island for three weeks because of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. After his release, Wong and his father settled in Sacramento, later moving to Los Angeles’s Chinatown.

Wong was one of the bohemian artists whose creativity and drive helped shape the cultural, artistic life of Los Angeles during the 1930s and 40s. He carved out a creative career working as a Depression-era muralist, California watercolorist, and film production illustrator. Wong worked at the Warner Bros. studio from 1942 to 1968, creating concept images for many films includingRebel Without a Cause [1955] and The Wild Bunch [1969], to name a few. These artworks conjured stunning environments, in many cases resembling beautifully executed architectural renderings.

In 2001, Wong was named a Disney Legend. Wong has been inducted into the World Kite Museum and Hall of Fame for his amazing creations, which include hundred-foot long centipedes, butterflies, and schools of delicately painted goldfish. These handmade kites inspired by the complex art of Chinese kite making will be a central exhibition showcase.

During the run of the exhibition, MOCA will offer a line-up of events, public programs, tours, and educational workshops.

On May 14, at 7PM, join Academy Award-winning filmmaker and animation historian John Canemaker on a talk on Tyrus Wong’s influential and unique contributions to the art direction of animated feature film Bambi (1942) and his experiences working at the Walt Disney studio.

Please check back on the Museum’s website for upcoming exhibition-related programs.

About Tyrus Wong

This exhibition and related programs are made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York Legislature. Additional support for the exhibition is provided by The Starr Foundation and Anla Cheng & Mark Kingdon. In-kind shipping has been provided by DHL.

 

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Love of Sun [www.loveofsun.org], a multimedia exhibit curated by Rachel Kennedy and produced by Moholy Ground Project

“Love of Sun”

Online-Only Multimedia Exhibit Depicts California Artists’ Visions of China — and Chinese Artists’ Visions of California

Love of Sun [www.loveofsun.org], a multimedia exhibit curated by Rachel Kennedy and produced by Moholy Ground Project, officially went live for an exclusive online-only exhibit from now to January 4, 2014. The site showcases photographs and videos by a variety of artists based in China and California, each depicting their unique vision of the opposite region. Works by Chinese artists includes Aphasia Li Chen’s powerful, Chris Marker-influenced film shot during her time with the Occupy Movement in the Bay Area, and Chen Zhou’s lonely, whimsical Superman-California Dreaming, beautifully shot with an iPhone 5, which evokes cross-cultural cosplay and social media. Works by California artists include Rian Dundan’s Fan, a sad, insightful photo series depicting (and deglamorizing) the off-screen life of Chinese superstar Fan Bing Bing, shot during Dundon’s time as the actress’ English tutor while she prepared for a role in Iron Man 3.

Named after a track of the same name by Beijing-based indie band The Ruins, Love of Sun highlights works which critically examine cultural, political, economic, and aesthetic influences between contemporary California and China. “The potential for cross-pollination between artists working in urban China and California deserves deep investigation,” explains Kennedy. “Economic and political relations between China and the US are at a historic high, and in the US, especially in technology and entertainment, California is the locus of this cultural exchange.” The decision to debut Love of Sun as an online installation also reflects how much this interaction between the two regions is largely mediated by the Internet.

After its end date, Love of Sun will transition to showings at gallery locations in California and China.

Love of Sun’s Featured Artists and Works

● Chen Zhou – “Superman/California Dreaming” (described above). View here: http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Chen_Zhou.html

● Rian Dundon – “fan” (described above). View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Dundon_Rian.html

● Li “Lillian” Chen – “aphasia” (described above). View
here: http://loveofsun.org/LOS_Chen_li.html

● Duo Peng – “Outsider”, a docu-photo series of San Francisco’s Chinatown inhabitants, who live in “a separate space” between the US and modern China. View here: http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Peng_Duo.html

● Chen Zhang – “Surface Read”, a series exploring China’s “post-1980s children” culture through conceptual photos. View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Zhang_Chen.html

● Calvin Lee – “Rancho Rodeo de la Aguas”, a series of photos of luxury products produced in China and displayed on Rodeo Drive. View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Lee_Calvin.html

● Jeannie Sims – “Readymaids” a photo series offering a glimpse at the Indonesian women destined to work in the McMansions of China’s newly wealthy. View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Simms_Jeannie.html

● Alice Tuan – “Shanghailand”, a photo-essay on everyday life in today’s Shanghai. View here: http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Tuan_Umbrellas_Shanghai.html
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Tuan_Fuxing_Park.html
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Tuan_Shopgirl.html

About the Creator/Curator and Publisher:

Rachel Kennedy is editor-in-chief of Moholy Ground and currently an MA candidate at California Institute of the Arts’ Aesthetics and Politics program.

Moholy Ground (moholyground.org) is a San Francisco-based non-profit founded and directed by John McCoy.

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