Tag Archives: Contemporary Art

Call for Papers: SYMPOSIUM “Writing and Picturing in Post-1945 Asian Art”

Call for Papers
SYMPOSIUM “Writing and Picturing in Post-1945 Asian Art”
(Part II: Graduate Student Workshops)

Center for the Art of East Asia, Center for East Asian Studies (University of Chicago), and PoNJA-GenKon are organizing a three-day international symposium Writing and Picturing in Post-1945 Asian Art to take place in April 2017. The second day of the symposium will include graduate student workshops to focus on the latest scholarship emerging from research done by graduate students and recent graduates in the field. We would like unpublished materials that will point to new directions of research and interpretation.

Symposium Summary
Dates: April 21–23, 2017
Place: Department of Art History, University of Chicago
Co-organized by Center for the Art of East Asia, Center for East Asian Studies, and PoNJA-GenKon

This symposium begins with the examination of two basic human activities, writing and picturing. In different cultures, these two have had historically varying relationships. To name just one, in East Asia, the two (書 and画) have traditionally been entwined, with ink and brush playing central roles. In postwar art, traditional and culturally specific modes of writing and picturing began to undergo transformation, inspired, facilitated, and accelerated in part by increased transnational exchange. In view of developments over the past half century, the symposium Writing and Picturing will survey the state of scholarship and discuss future directions in museological and art-historical studies. The symposium organizers aspire to form a bridge between the established field of modernist art history and newly evolving contemporary art while casting a wider geographical net beyond East Asia. By providing a platform for the presentation of new research on various practices that merge writing and picturing in postwar and contemporary art, we aim to create a watershed for the culturally dynamic rethinking of these fundamental human acts. For the full concept statement and questions, please contact mailponja@gmail.com.

Eligibility for Submission
Students currently enrolled in graduate-level institutions anywhere in the world and recent PhDs who have received their degrees from such institutions in the past two years are eligible to submit paper proposals.

General Parameters
Within the scope of the symposium, proposed papers should be based on original and critical research within the following parameters:

1) the paper must address the work of art and related media in visual culture (e.g. film, design, architecture, manga, etc.) produced after 1945
2) the artist(s) must have been either born in Asia, of Asian descent, or active in Asia
3) the work must demonstrably relate to aesthetic or socio-political situations in Asia after 1945.
4) the paper may address much broader genres of expression than calligraphy, such as ceramic and textile art, as long as it presents a unique approach to the issue of tradition and modernity.
5) You are welcome to submit more than one proposal. However, you will have only one selected paper to present during the program.

Please send:

1) your proposal, no more than 500 words
2) your CV, no more than 2 pages
3) if you want to attach image(s), no more than 1MB (please scale down the files)

Send to: mailponja@gmail.com
Due: August 15, Monday, 2016

Funding

Please direct any question to mailponja@gmail.com.

Selection Committee
Co-Chairs: Reiko Tomii, Miwako Tezuka, Chelsea Foxwell
Committee members: Joan Kee, David Raskin

About PoNJA-GenKon
PoNJA-GenKon is an acronym for “Post Nineteen-forty-five Japanese Art / Gendai Bijutsu Kondankai,” an online discussion group of students, art professionals, artists, and individuals interested in contemporary Japanese art across the globe. It was founded in 2003 by two scholars, Dr. Reiko Tomii and Dr. Miwako Tezuka. Also known in its short form, PoNJA, the group fosters communication among the members, shares knowledge with the public, and helps develop this area of study. Today, it has grown to include more than 120 members globally, including all the key leaders and innovators of this still-young field. So much so, “ponja” as a terminology has also come to signify the field of postwar and contemporary Japanese art history.

Miwako Tezuka's photo.
Lead Image: Enrico Isamu Oyama (b.1983), Improvised Mural (Walls), detail, 2015. Acrylic-­‐based aerosol, acrylic paint and sumi ink on walls. (H) 3.8 m x (L) 69.5 m (overall). Installation at Tringle Space, Chelsea College of Arts, University of the Arts, London, United Kingdom. Photo by Tom Carter

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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World book launch and panel at Queens Museum of Art

http://www.queensmuseum.org/events/zhang-hongtu-expanding-visions-of-a-shrinking-world

ZH

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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World
Book Launch and Panel Discussion

Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World is edited  by Luchia Meihua Lee, guest curator of Zhang Hongtu, and Jerome Silbergeld. Twelve leading art experts, art historians, and critics have reviewed the life, career, and artistic development of New York based Chinese artist Zhang Hongtu. Please join us for a conversation about the book and exhibition with Jerome Silbergeld and contributors Eugenie Tsai and Lilly Wei.

A pioneer in contemporary Chinese art, Zhang created the first example of “China Pop” art, and his oeuvre is as diverse, intellectually complex, and engaging as it is entertaining. From painting and sculpture to computer generated works and multimedia projects, Zhang’s art is equally rich in terms of China’s history and its current events, containing profound reflections on China’s oldest cultural habits and contemporary preoccupations. He provides a model of cross-cultural interaction designed to make Asian and Western audiences look more closely at each other and at themselves to recognize the beliefs they hold and the unexamined values they adhere to.

From his early work in China during the Cultural Revolution to his decades as an artist in New York, Zhang reflects the complex attitudes of a scholar-artist toward modernity, as well as toward Asian and Western societies and himself.  Placing Zhang in the context of his cultural milieu both in China and in the Chinese immigrant artist community in America, this volume’s contributors examine his adaptations of classic art to reflect a contemporary sensibility, his relation to Cubism and Social Realism, his collaboration with the celebrated fashion designer Vivienne Tam, and his visual critique of China’s current environmental crisis.

Jerome Silbergeld is the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History at Princeton University and director of Princeton’s Tang Center for East Asian Art. A specialist in Song-Yuan period painting, he has published more than eighty books, catalogues, articles, and book chapters on topics in traditional and contemporary Chinese painting, traditional architecture and gardens, cinema and photography. He has also curated and co-curated eight exhibitions, including the first major solo exhibition in America by a Chinese artist, in 1988. His books on cinema and photography include China Into Film, Hitchcock with a Chinese Face, and Humanism in China. On contemporary art, his books includeContradictions: Artistic Life, the Socialist State, and the Chinese Painter Li Huasheng, the first extensive study of any PRC artist, which became a New York Times notable book of the year in 1993; Outside In, on the globalization and loss of “Chineseness” of Chinese art; and ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art.

Eugenie Tsai has been John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum since 2007. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P.S.1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University

Lilly Wei is a New York-based independent curator and critic whose focus is global contemporary art. She has written regularly for Art in America since 1984 and is a contributing editor at ARTnews and  formerly one at Art Asia Pacific.  Among other national and international publications, Wei has also written for Art & Australia, Asian Art News, Sanat Dünyamiz, Art Papers, Sculpture Magazine, Studio International, Tema Celeste, Flash Art, Art Press, and Art and Auction, and has frequently reported on international biennials such as those of Venice, Sydney, Cairo, Athens, Reykjavik, Shenzhen and Hong Kong and international exhibitions such as Documenta and Sonsbeek, the sculpture international in the Netherlands.  She has been the author of many exhibition catalogues and brochures on contemporary art, including publications for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Knoedler, Marlborough and Pace Galleries, New York, NY. She has curated numerous exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Asia. Two of her most recent exhibitions were “The Museum Imagined” at Danese/Corey, New York, NY, and “Uncanny/Figure” at Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs.  Wei lectures on critical and curatorial practices and serves on numerous advisory committees and review panels.  She was born in Chengdu, China and has an MA in art history from Columbia University, New York.

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Between Savage and Civilized: Negotiating a Space for Indigenous Art in the 21st Century — at NYU


Between Savage and Civilized: Negotiating a Space for Indigenous Art in the 21st Century
Co-presented by the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU and NYU Draper Program

Tuesday, April 29, 2014
6-8PM

A/P/A Institute at NYU
8 Washington Mews

What does it mean to be an “Indigenous artist” working between his/her own community and the contemporary global art world? To what degree has the global art world embraced the “tribal”, and the “tribal” interfaced with western art? These are some of the questions Brett Graham will explore, drawing from examples in his own work, and recent indigenous art exhibitions such as Sakahan: International Indigenous Art. Mario Caro (Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow, NYU Draper Program) provides an introduction.

DETAILS + RSVP

Image credit: Jennifer French.

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CARE Package Opens in Philadelphia on 10/5/12

Twelve Gates Arts Presents:

CARE Package c/o Philadelphia, PA

Curated by Ombretta Agró Andruff in collaboration with the artists
October 5 – October 26, 2012
Opening Reception with the artists: Friday October 5, 6pm-8pm

51 North Second St., Old City
Philadelphia, PA 19106
info@twelvegatesarts.org
215.253.8578
http://twelvegatesarts.org/

Twelve Gates Arts is thrilled to host the inaugural showing of CARE Package a small-scale international traveling show of five female artists of Asian descent. Taking inspiration from the concept of care package sent to each host country, artists Shelly Bahl, Shelly Jyoti, Laura Kina, Saira Wasim, and Anida Yoeu Ali created multi-media “gifts” to be shared with local audiences. Philadelphia is the city where packages destined for Europe after WWII were assembled for shipment by the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE, Inc.); now it is set to be the first city to receive this unique gift. The universal concept of a gift here acts as a stage for the artists’ stories, which promise to tackle issues of nationhood, race, gender, religion, & economic exploitation.

Shelly Bahl is a visual and media artist born in Benares, India, and currently based in New York City. Her interdisciplinary work in drawing, painting, sculpture/ installation, photography and video, has appeared in a number of solo and group exhibitions in North America and internationally over the past 16 years. Her recent projects include group exhibitions at: Queens Museum of Art, White Box, Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, India Art Summit, Aicon Gallery, and Religare Arts Initiative.

Shelly Jyoti is a New Delhi based visual artist, fashion-designer, a poet and an independent curator whose research centers on designs of  20th century textiles, costumes and historical iconographic elements within the cultural context of Indian history.  Her textile art series ‘Indigo Narratives ‘ (2009-12) and ‘Beyond Mithila’ (2008-12) have shown internationally and have been reviewed by leading national newspapers and Art magazines. Her essays and art publications are included in Sahitya Akademi of Indian English literature and Art magazines. She has lectured and held workshop series on 6 &7th Century Indian art-forms in academic institutions and international universities.

Laura Kina is Associate Professor of Art, Media, and Design at DePaul University in Chicago, IL. Her paintings and textile works address Asian American history and mixed race representations.  Her artwork has shown internationally and been published in Modeling Citizenship: Jewish and Asian American Writing (Temple University Press, 2011); Other Tongues: Mixed-Race Women Speak Out (Inanna Publications, 2010); and Embracing Ambiguity: Faces of the Future (Cal State Fullerton, 2010); The New Authentics: Artists of the Post-Jewish Generation (Spertus Museum, 2007).

Saira Wasim has carved a niche for herself with her innovative and meticulously crafted Persian miniatures, which she employs to make devastating political and social commentary. Ms. Wasim’s work has been widely feted, and has been exhibited at numerous prominent art institutions including the Whitney Museum of American Art, Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, the Asia Society in New York, and the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, CT. She has recently noted that persecution as an Ahmadiyya Muslim was key in shaping her artistic perspectives.  New York Times describes her work as “exquisite political cartoons that conjure and sometimes borrow directly from Norman Rockwell”.

Anida Yoeu Ali is a performance artist, writer, and global agitator. She is a first generation Muslim Khmer woman born in Cambodia and raised in Chicago. In 2011, Ali returned to work in Phnom Penh as part of her U.S. Fulbright Fellowship research on creation mythologies. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to art making, her installation and performance works investigate the artistic, spiritual and political collisions of a hybrid transnational identity. From the Faroe Islands to the Bronx, Copenhagen to Ho Chi Minh City, she lectures, exhibits and performs internationally. Ali is a collaborative partner with Studio Revolt, an independent media lab operating out of Phnom Penh where she currently resides.

Ombretta Agrò Andruff is a New York-based freelance curator, art critic and consultant. She has curated solo and group shows in Europe, the US, and India, collaborating with museums, art festivals, and art fairs – such as Queens Museum of Art, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, The Armory Show, The Art Basel Miami Fair, The Downtown Arts Festival, The d.u.m.b.o. art under the Bridge Festival. She is a New York contributor for Italian art magazines Arte Critica, Tema Celeste, and Label and collaborates as well with the New York-based, The Art Tribune and New York Arts Magazine. She has recently joined the staff of Asian Contemporary Art Week as Associate Director.

Twelve Gates Arts (12G) is a non profit (501(c)(3) pending) organization created with the aim to showcase international arts bound by the sensibilities of a diaspora identity, including the South Asian identity, to create and promote projects crossing cultural and geographical boundaries, and to educate the community about diaspora culture.

 http://facebook.com/twelvegates

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