Tag Archives: Michelle Loh

DAAN at College Art Association 2017 in NYC

The Diasporic Asian Art Network [DAAN] is delighted to announce the upcoming DAAN events during the College Art Association 2017 week in New York City from February 16-18, 2017. We hope that you can attend one or all of them!
DAAN GALLERY VISIT: Art 100 Gallery New York
Thursday, February 16
555 West 25th Street, Ground Floor
Free event
5h30pm — Discussion with Art 100 New York Gallery Director Michelle Loh
6h00pm — Exhibition opening reception for Construction and Contemplation: Noa Charuvi, Li Gang
 
About the exhibit:
Construction and Contemplation 
Noa Charuvi, Li Gang
Opening Reception: Thursday, February 16, 2017 6pm-8pm
February 16  – March 31, 2017

Noa Charuvi was born in Jerusalem, and now lives and works in New York City.  She holds a Master’s Degree in Fine Art from the School of Visual Arts in New York and a Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Art from the Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem.   Her work is in the Time Equities collection and has been exhibited internationally, including at the Bronx Museum of Art and the Haifa Museum of Arts in Israel.  

Li Gang was born in Guangdong, China in 1962.  He now lives and works in Beijing. He holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing.  Li’s work has been exhibited in Strasbourg, France, Heidelberg, Germany, the Venice Biennale; and in China at Today Art Museum among others.  His work is held in the collection of the Central Academy of Fine Arts Museum, the Shanghai Artists Association, and the Guangdong Museum of Art.

 Noa Charuvi, White Sheet, Oil on Canvas
 

Li Gang, No 20161018, Ink on Paper

 
DAAN AFFILIATED SOCIETY PANEL CAA:

CANADA 150: Asian Canadians and Visual Culture in National Celebrations

Saturday, Feb 18, 2017
3:30PM – 5:00 PM
New York Hilton Midtown, 1335 6th Ave, New York
Regent Parlor, 2nd Floor
Conference registration required

Chairs: Alice Ming Wai Jim, Concordia University; Victoria Nolte, Carleton University

Souvenirs of the Self and The Long View: Canadian National Parks and the Transnational Asian Canadian Subject within Nature
Jin-me Yoon, Simon Fraser University

Collecting “Strangeness” and “Familiarity”: Asian Canadian Photo-Poetics
Glenn Deer, University of British Columbia

Transnational Kinship, Diasporic Mourning, and Belonging in the Canadian Animation World: The Moving Images of Leslie Supnet’s gains + losses
Marissa Largo, University of Toronto

 

 

Courtesy of the artist. Jin-me Yoon, video still, Other Hauntings: A Geography Beloved (Dance), 2016, Single channel video.
More about Jin-me Yoon’s work: Through the use of gestures, activist Tera maps the geography of Gangjeong village, Jeju Island, South Korea onto her body; the beloved intimate landscape she struggles to preserve in the face ecological and social devastation caused by the recent construction of a Naval Base. A strange apparition, a seaweed-headed soldier of ambiguous gender, troubles our understanding of masculinity as well as the acceptance of military state-sanctioned violence against citizens, creatures small and large, the land, sea and all sustaining life ways.
DAAN DINNER:
After the DAAN panel, we will be gathering to go to Chinatown to visit the changing neighborhood including the new Pearl River Mart with their gallery space now showing work by artist Wiena Lin. We will talk with Pearl River Mart president Joanne Kwong. We will also visit other spaces and end for dinner at August Gatherings, 266 Canal Street (between Cortlandt Alley and Lafayette St). We will also discuss DAAN business at the start of the dinner. Dinner is Dutch treat. Please RSVP to achang@nyu.edu

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Oil & Water Symposium at Museum of Chinese in America, NYC April 27th

Website: http://www.mocanyc.org/visit/events/oil_water_symposium
Title: Oil & Water Symposium
Date: Sun, Apr 27, 2014 from 10am – 4pm
Location: Museum of China in America, 215 Centre Street New York, NY 10013

Admission: $15/Adults; $10/MOCA Members, Students, and Seniors

Advanced reservation required:
RSVP: Call now: 212-619-4785 or email: programs@mocanyc.org

The Museum of Chinese in America in New York City (MOCA) will host a scholarly symposium in conjunction with MOCA’s upcoming exhibition Oil & Water: Reinterpreting Ink, opening April 24th. The exhibition will feature the work of three renowned Chinese contemporary artists: Qiu Deshu, Wei Jia, and Zhang Hongtu.

This symposium is composed of experts in the field of Chinese and American art history who will discuss the trajectory of Chinese ink art from traditional landscape painting and calligraphy to the creative reinterpretation of these historic models, reflecting on the social, political and artistic ramifications of their development. The dialogues will unpack the intellectual importance of the ever-developing ink genre and the role these artists play in shaping contemporary art in New York.

SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM:

• 10:00 – 10:30AM
Welcome and Introduction by Herb Tam, Carolyn Hsu-Balcer, and Michelle Loh

• 10:30AM – 11:30AM
Let Hundred Flowers Bloom: Contemporary Ink in the 21st Century by Julia F. Andrews , Kuiyi Shen, and Melissa Chiu
Moderate by John Rajchman

• 11:30AM – 12:00PM
Artist Interview: Wei Jia and Robert C. Morgan

• 12:00AM – 12:30PM
Artist Interview: Zhang Hongtu and Richard Vine

12:30PM – 1:30PM Lunch Break

• 1:30PM – 2:30PM The Emergence of Asian Art and Asian American Art in the 20th Century

What is Asian, what is American? by Lilly Wei, Aileen Wang (1:30PM – 2:00PM)

How Does Political Evolution and Artistic Revolution in China and America Shape the Development of Asian/American Art by Jerome Cohen (2:00PM – 2:30PM)

• 2:30PM – 3:00PM
Artist Interview: Qiu Deshu and Joan Cohen

3:00PM – 4:00PM Gallery Tour

Panelists include Julia Andrews (Professor, Department of the History of Art, Ohio State University), Carolyn Hsu-Balcer, Jerome Cohen (Professor of Law at New York University School of Law), Melissa Chiu (Director, Asia Society Musuem), Qiu Deshu (featured artist), Michelle Loh (Art Consultant; Director, Athena Art Advisory), Robert C. Morgan (Art Critic and Artist; Professor Emeritus, Art History, Rochester Institute of Technology), John Rajchman (Director, the Modern Art M.A. Program, Columbia University), Kuiyi Shen (Professor, Asian Art History, Theory and Criticism, University of California, San Diego), Herb Tam (Curator, MOCA), Joan Lebold Cohen, Richard Vine (Managing Editor, Art in America), Aileen Wang (Assistant Professor, Art History and Museum Studies, LIU Post), Lilly Wei (art critic and independent curator), Wei Jia (featured artist), and Zhang Hongtu (featured artist).

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Vaulting Limits: Cao Jigang, Lin Yan, Wei Jia, Xiao Bing, Yuan Zuo at Tenri Cultural Institute, NYC

Tenri Cultural Institute, 43A West 13 Street, NYC, proudly presents Vaulting Limits:  Cao Jigang,  Lin Yan, Wei Jia,  Xiao Bing,  Yuan Zuo Co-Curated by Thalia Vrachopoulos and Michelle Y. Loh. The show will run May 4-25, 2012 with an Opening Reception on Thursday May 10, 6-8 PM and a Panel Discussion on Saturday May 12, 3-5 PM.

Trained in modern European painting and influenced by the Chinese ink tradition, Cao Jigang, Lin Yan, Wei Jia, Xiao Bing and Yuan Zuo explore the borders between abstraction and realism, painting and sculpture, symbolism and literalness, improvisation and regimented discipline. While ostensibly nebulous, the artworks included in the show, simultaneously appear startling; familiar yet strangely unsettling providing an enlightening flicker of displacement. All five artists are graduates of the most advanced and prestigious, yet government sponsored art academy in Beijing , the China Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA). They’ve straddled the categories of traditional and contemporary producing works that, while employing time-honored methods and materials are meaningful to the contemporary world. Lin Yan expresses her political pre-occupations through xuan paper that in itself has a rich cultural history dating back to the Tang Dynasty when it was used for calligraphy, painting and book printing. She casts it to create bricks that make up the grid in a distressed American flag, or she tears it to symbolize a cultural deterioration, or overwhelming consumerism. Wei Jia’s collage works with hand made paper relate to calligraphy with which he embellishes his work’s surfaces as well as its layers to explore his cultural roots. Wei incorporates both the purposeful and accidental effects of his paper and paint within its layers, either calligraphic text with meaning or lettering for its own sake. Cao Jigang’s landscapes, while addressing historic entities, simultaneously fragment reality at times by offering detailed views or by dividing it into panels. While ostensibly appearing like the 11th century Monumental Song mode of monochrome because of its quiet color, Cao’s landscapes are more about the cun or contour strokes used to define mountains, hills, and valleys that act as cyphers of identity. Fragmentation, separation and Heraclitan flux or eruption can partly describe the work of Xiao Bing. However, through all of this seeming abstract chaos it is possible to make out familiar scenes such as the Great Wall or other historic landmark. This ‘misty screen’ as he calls it that overlays his buildings, results in a blurry, haziness much like that used by Turner in his Vortex-like compositions. Yuan Zuo is a scholar and painter familiar not only with his own culture’s historic past but also with that of the west. However, he is an independent thinker as seen through his art statement who claims that “the subject of the painting should be determined by the artist and be devoid of outside influences.” This statement is borne out by Yuan’s abstract works that although engage the gesture in their expressionist tendency, are coloristic symphonies.

These five artists Cao, Lin, Wei, Xiao and Yuan have been put together for this show not only because they’re graduates of the same academy, but also for their retention of aspects of their original culture while working within a globalized world. This is a somewhat difficult ambition, as a discourse or dialog with multiple cultures is somewhat like the immigrant experience whose adoptive country offers an alternative place to live, yet doesn’t understand his/her originating social context. Nevertheless, these five artists have successfully conveyed their personal views while maintaining their cultural integrity to sensitively express their experience within an international world.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Please call 212-645-2800 or write to the Administrative Director Yuji Okui at yuji@tenri.org

or to the Exhibitions Director Thalia Vrachopoulos at tvrachopoulos@gmail.com or 212-691-7978.

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