Tag Archives: Museum of Chinese in America

Curators in Conversation: Eugenie Tsai at the Museum of Chinese in America, NY

http://www.mocanyc.org/visit/events/curators_conv_eugenie_tsai

Curators in Conversation: Eugenie Tsai

Wed, Mar 9, 2016 @ 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Tickets: $12/adult; $8/senior (65+) and students (with valid ID); FREE for MOCA members

Click here to purchase tickets

Location: Museum of Chinese in America

215 Centre Street, New York, NY

MOCA presents a dynamic new program series that engages Chinese American curators, artists and cultural producers across generations and geographies in critical conversations to deeply investigate the aesthetic concerns, subject matter, and experiences within the Chinese and Asian American cultural community.

 

The series is moderated by Herb Tam, Curator and Director of Exhibitions at MOCA.

Curator Bio:

 

Eugenie Tsai joined the Brooklyn Museum in the fall of 2007 as the John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art. With Patrick Amsellem, she organized 21: Selections of Contemporary Art from the Brooklyn Museum, a long-term installation that opened on September 19, 2008. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P. S. 1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004; Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota and a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

 

Upcoming Curators in Conversation:

 

Curators in Conversation: Christopher Y. Lew

Friday, May 20, 2016 | 6:30pm

 

Curators in Conversation: Xin Wang

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 | 6:30pm

 

Curators in Conversation: Paul Chan

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 6:30pm

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CONVERSATION: DORYUN CHONG AND HERB TAM ON TSENG KWONG CHI at MOCA

MOCA

CONVERSATION: DORYUN CHONG AND HERB TAM ON TSENG KWONG CHI

THURSDAY, JUNE 25, 2015 AT 6.30 PM – 8.00 PM
MUSEUM OF CHINESE IN AMERICA
215 CENTER STREET, NEW YORK CITY

Doryun Chong, chief curator, M+ Hong Kong, and Herb Tam, curator and director of exhibitions, Museum of Chinese in America, will discuss Tseng’s life and art in New York, his influence on younger Chinese artists, and how his cultural identity may have impacted his work.
Generously supported by the Asian Cultural Council. Co-sponsored by the Museum of Chinese in America and NYU’s Grey Art Gallery.

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WEDNESDAY NIGHTS WALK-THROUGH WITH MUNA TSENG
Muna Tseng will offer walk-throughs of the exhibition “Tseng Kwong Chi: Performing for the Camera” on Wednesday nights in the month of June. Please RSVP with your date to reserve your spot. The tour from 7.00 to 7.30 pm FREE.

Exhibition on view: APRIL 21 – JULY 11, 2015
GREY ART GALLERY, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY
100 WASHINGTON SQUARE EAST, NEW YORK CITY

Cuny Tv

CUNY TV
On Ch. 75 (Time Warner Cable and Cablevision/Optimum Brooklyn), Ch. 77 (RCN Cable) and Ch. 30 (Verizon FiOS)
ASIAN AMERICAN LIFE
4 repeat screenings
Friday, June 1910:00am, 3:00pm, 8:30pm
Sunday, June 2112:00pm

CUNY TV features the two current exhibitions on Tseng Kwong Chi at the Grey Art Gallery and the Metropolitan Museum of Art on its Asian American Life, an in-depth news magazine program that addresses topical issues affecting the Asian American communities nationwide and profiles Asian American leaders.
Paul Lin interviews choreographer Muna Tseng about Kwong Chi’s life and her tribute to him in her dance-performance piece “SlutForArt a.k.a. Ambiguous Ambassador”.

 

 

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Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong at Museum of Chinese in America, NYC

http://www.mocanyc.org/exhibitions/water_to_paper_paint_to_sky_the_art_of_tyrus_wong

Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong

March 26, 2015 – September 13, 2015

CURATORS’ TOUR
SECOND AND FOURTH THURSDAYS 

APRIL 9 – SEPTEMBER 10 | 6:30 PM

Explore Tyrus Wong’s craft, as well as lasting influence of his artistic vision and style. Free with admission!

CLICK HERE FOR CURATORS’ TOUR SCHEDULE

In celebration of the Museum’s 35th anniversary this spring, MOCA is proud to present Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong. Celebrated painter, muralist, kite-maker, lithographer and calligrapher, Tyrus Wong is one of the greatest Chinese American artists of the 20th century. This highly anticipated exhibition showcases his extraordinary body of work including Disney’s iconic American children’s classic, Bambi. Water to Paper, Paint to Sky: The Art of Tyrus Wong is organized by The Walt Disney Family Museum, San Francisco, CA.

This retrospective exhibition features Wong’s extensive body of work which includes his paintings, hand-painted ceramics, original greeting cards, works on paper, and latest kite creations. It was the ethereal beauty of Wong’s Eastern influenced paintings, his sense of color, richness, and imagination that caught Walt Disney’s eye and became the inspiration for the animated feature Bambi (1942). Wong’s singular vision and impressionistic art influenced the groundbreaking movie’s overall visual style and changed the way animation art was presented.

Arriving in the United States with his father in 1919 from the Toishan district in Guangdong, China, Wong was initially detained in Angel Island for three weeks because of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. After his release, Wong and his father settled in Sacramento, later moving to Los Angeles’s Chinatown.

Wong was one of the bohemian artists whose creativity and drive helped shape the cultural, artistic life of Los Angeles during the 1930s and 40s. He carved out a creative career working as a Depression-era muralist, California watercolorist, and film production illustrator. Wong worked at the Warner Bros. studio from 1942 to 1968, creating concept images for many films includingRebel Without a Cause [1955] and The Wild Bunch [1969], to name a few. These artworks conjured stunning environments, in many cases resembling beautifully executed architectural renderings.

In 2001, Wong was named a Disney Legend. Wong has been inducted into the World Kite Museum and Hall of Fame for his amazing creations, which include hundred-foot long centipedes, butterflies, and schools of delicately painted goldfish. These handmade kites inspired by the complex art of Chinese kite making will be a central exhibition showcase.

During the run of the exhibition, MOCA will offer a line-up of events, public programs, tours, and educational workshops.

On May 14, at 7PM, join Academy Award-winning filmmaker and animation historian John Canemaker on a talk on Tyrus Wong’s influential and unique contributions to the art direction of animated feature film Bambi (1942) and his experiences working at the Walt Disney studio.

Please check back on the Museum’s website for upcoming exhibition-related programs.

About Tyrus Wong

This exhibition and related programs are made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York Legislature. Additional support for the exhibition is provided by The Starr Foundation and Anla Cheng & Mark Kingdon. In-kind shipping has been provided by DHL.

 

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The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA): “Waves of Identity: 35 Years of Archiving” and “Memory Prints: The Story World of Phillip Chen”

Thu, Sep 25, 2014 – Sun, Mar 1, 2015

The Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) will present its groundbreaking exhibition examining Chinese American identity,Waves of Identity: 35 Years of Archiving. The title of the exhibit was inspired by a Chinese proverb, “Each wave of the Yangtze River pushes at the wave ahead.” As a metaphor for Chinese American history, the waves represent successive generations of immigrants unearthing the histories of those that came before them, and in the process of discovery, addressing pertinent issues of identity, memory and history. To date, MOCA owns the largest Chinese American collection in the United States, featuring over 65,000 artifacts, oral histories, textiles, photographs, and more. The exhibition will highlight the best of its archives and special collections while engaging visitors in a discussion about identity. The Museum will celebrate its 35th year anniversary in January 2015.

  • Thu, Sep 25, 2014 – Sun, Mar 1, 2015

    Memory Prints is a solo exhibition by Phillip Chen, a visual artist from the Midwest. In fifteen relief etchings centering around his family, Chen reckons with significant moments in Chinese American history. At first glance, individually and as an ensemble, these relief prints are schematic and enigmatic. Rooted in personal experiences, the prints depict precisely drawn tools and everyday objects that reflect his family’s occupational histories. The etchings can be approached as part futurist blueprints and part archaeologic shards, each juxtaposed in an almost Rube Goldberg set of relationships and movements. Their rich darkness reveal precisely drawn tools and everyday objects, an occasional human visage. Each array on each print is imaginatively filled in with lines that interlink and interrelate the items.

     

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MOCATALKS: Unearthing the Story World of Phillip Chen

MOCATALKS: Unearthing the Story World of Phillip Chen

Admission: $12 for Adults; FREE for Members Click Here to Register 

Visual artist Phillip Chen creates relief etchings inspired by his family stories. One print unearths his great grandfather’s experience as a gold miner in California during the Gold Rush in the 1860s. Another is based on his uncle who owned the only restaurant in Fort Wayne, Indiana that served African Americans in the 1930s. Please join Phillip Chen in conversation with MOCA’s co-founder Jack (John Kuo Wei) Tchen as they discuss the intriguing yet complex stories within these amazing prints and address the important distinction between history and memory.

This program is held in conjunction with the exhibition Memory Prints: The Story World of Phillip Chen and co-sponsored by the A/P/A Institute at New York University.

About the artist

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Phillip Chen received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois, Chicago, and master of fine arts degree from School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work in print media has been exhibited in over one hundred and fifty locations nationally and internationally and is held by public collections that include Brooklyn Museum, Carnegie Institute Museum of Art, Art Institute of Chicago, San Francisco Museum of Fine Arts, and Three Shadows Photography Art Centre, Beijing. He has served as an evaluator for College Art Association, National Endowment for the Arts, and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. His awards include grants from National Endowment for the Arts and The Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation. Phillip Chen is Professor of Drawing and Printmaking at Drake University.

About the curator

Jack (John Kuo Wei) Tchen is the founding director of the A/P/A (Asian/Pacific /American) Studies Program and Institute at New York University, NYU. Professor Tchen co-founded the Museum of Chinese in America in 1979-80 where he continues to serve as senior historian. Yellow Peril! An Archive of Anti-Asian Fear is his most recent book, co-authored/edited with Dylan Yeats. He is also author of the award-winning books New York before Chinatown: Orientalism and the Shaping of American Culture, 1776-1882 andGenthe’s Photographs of San Francisco’s Old Chinatown, 1895-1905, and he edited Paul C. P. Siu’s classic The Chinese Laundryman: A Study of Social Isolation. In 1991, he was awarded the Charles S. Frankel Prize from the National Endowment for the Humanities (renamed The National Medal of Humanities).

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Oil & Water Symposium at Museum of Chinese in America, NYC April 27th

Website: http://www.mocanyc.org/visit/events/oil_water_symposium
Title: Oil & Water Symposium
Date: Sun, Apr 27, 2014 from 10am – 4pm
Location: Museum of China in America, 215 Centre Street New York, NY 10013

Admission: $15/Adults; $10/MOCA Members, Students, and Seniors

Advanced reservation required:
RSVP: Call now: 212-619-4785 or email: programs@mocanyc.org

The Museum of Chinese in America in New York City (MOCA) will host a scholarly symposium in conjunction with MOCA’s upcoming exhibition Oil & Water: Reinterpreting Ink, opening April 24th. The exhibition will feature the work of three renowned Chinese contemporary artists: Qiu Deshu, Wei Jia, and Zhang Hongtu.

This symposium is composed of experts in the field of Chinese and American art history who will discuss the trajectory of Chinese ink art from traditional landscape painting and calligraphy to the creative reinterpretation of these historic models, reflecting on the social, political and artistic ramifications of their development. The dialogues will unpack the intellectual importance of the ever-developing ink genre and the role these artists play in shaping contemporary art in New York.

SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM:

• 10:00 – 10:30AM
Welcome and Introduction by Herb Tam, Carolyn Hsu-Balcer, and Michelle Loh

• 10:30AM – 11:30AM
Let Hundred Flowers Bloom: Contemporary Ink in the 21st Century by Julia F. Andrews , Kuiyi Shen, and Melissa Chiu
Moderate by John Rajchman

• 11:30AM – 12:00PM
Artist Interview: Wei Jia and Robert C. Morgan

• 12:00AM – 12:30PM
Artist Interview: Zhang Hongtu and Richard Vine

12:30PM – 1:30PM Lunch Break

• 1:30PM – 2:30PM The Emergence of Asian Art and Asian American Art in the 20th Century

What is Asian, what is American? by Lilly Wei, Aileen Wang (1:30PM – 2:00PM)

How Does Political Evolution and Artistic Revolution in China and America Shape the Development of Asian/American Art by Jerome Cohen (2:00PM – 2:30PM)

• 2:30PM – 3:00PM
Artist Interview: Qiu Deshu and Joan Cohen

3:00PM – 4:00PM Gallery Tour

Panelists include Julia Andrews (Professor, Department of the History of Art, Ohio State University), Carolyn Hsu-Balcer, Jerome Cohen (Professor of Law at New York University School of Law), Melissa Chiu (Director, Asia Society Musuem), Qiu Deshu (featured artist), Michelle Loh (Art Consultant; Director, Athena Art Advisory), Robert C. Morgan (Art Critic and Artist; Professor Emeritus, Art History, Rochester Institute of Technology), John Rajchman (Director, the Modern Art M.A. Program, Columbia University), Kuiyi Shen (Professor, Asian Art History, Theory and Criticism, University of California, San Diego), Herb Tam (Curator, MOCA), Joan Lebold Cohen, Richard Vine (Managing Editor, Art in America), Aileen Wang (Assistant Professor, Art History and Museum Studies, LIU Post), Lilly Wei (art critic and independent curator), Wei Jia (featured artist), and Zhang Hongtu (featured artist).

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“Serve the People: The Asian American Movement in New York” at Interference Archive, Curated by Ryan Wong

Serve the People: The Asian American Movement in New York

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Thursday December 5, 2013 – Sunday February 23, 2014

Opening: Thursday December 5, 7-10pm

Serve the People: The Asian American Movement in New York charts a history of Asian American activism, organizing, and cultural production in the 1970s, the first exhibition to focus on New York as a center of this national phenomenon. Through posters, leaflets, newspapers, film, and music, Serve the People shows how Asian American identity was shaped by reclaimed histories, revolutionary politics, feminist awareness, third worldism, and community organizing. The culture created by young activists and artists in the movement embodied their ideals, speaking to the excitement and urgency of the time.

Curated by Ryan Wong.

In 1970s New York, one might have heard the folk group A Grain of Sand sing about “the struggle,” walked by a mural celebrating Asian American histories, or attended a screening of a documentary on garment workers in Chinatown. I Wor Kuen and Worker’s Viewpoint Organization distributed their revolutionary messages through newspapers and study groups, while community organizations like Asian Americans for Equal Employment galvanized Chinatown into mass protests. Basement Workshop served as an umbrella for artists’ projects as well as groups like Chinatown Health Fair, Asian American Resource Center, and the Amerasia Creative Arts Program.

In recovering and presenting this past, Serve the People cuts against the stereotype of political apathy among Asian Americans, and offers a radical history for today’s activists to build upon. The political horizon for Movement activists was limitless, whether they worked towards community control, artistic self-expression, or political overthrow. This energy is palpable in the culture they produced. In light of the great immigration of Asians to America since the 1960s and the looming questions of America’s economic and political relation to Asia, these works remind us of a moment of pride and revolution for a newly-formed identity.

Visitors are invited to handle and read through two of Interference Archive’s newest acquisitions: the seminal collection of art and poetry Yellow Pearl, and copies of the nationally-circulated Bridge Magazine. Other objects on display include the Asian Americans for Action Newsletter (published by Yuri and Bill Kochiyama in their home), buttons and posters for the Chinatown Health Fair, iconic photographs of the Peter Yew police brutality protests by Corky Lee, and posters designed by artist Tomie Arai.

A full schedule of public programs will accompany the exhibition, including film screenings, discussions, and readings. Please check back here for a full list. As of now, the following events are scheduled:

Sunday December 8, 2013
2-8pm
Queens Museum, Flushing Meadows Corona Park (NOT AT INTERFERENCE ARCHIVE)

Gathering the Grassroots
Over twenty organizations, representing the next generation of Asian American activism, will convene at this annual event to discuss collaboration and movement building.
__________

Tuesday December 10, 2013
7-9pm
Interference Archive

Serve the People Gallery Tour and Interference Archive Open House
A gallery tour with curator Ryan Wong
__________

Sunday December 15, 2013
1-2pm
Chinatown, Manhattan

Walking Tour: A People’s History of Chinatown
A one-hour walking tour of major sites of struggle and community-building in Manhattan’s Chinatown during the 1970s and 80s. Viewing of exhibition at Interference Archive afterwards.
(Meet by the Statue of Confucius at Confucius Plaza, Intersection of Bowery and Division St.)
__________

Wednesday January 15, 2014
7pm
Interference Archive

Film Night: Short Films from the Movement
A sampling of short films produced during the Asian American Movement focused on reclaiming histories and capturing contemporary organizing.
__________

 

Thank you to our generous lenders, A/P/A Institute at NYU, Tomie Arai, Corky Lee, and Museum of Chinese in America. Original research and exhibition development for Serve the People supported by Museum of Chinese in America.

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Museum of Chinese in America Opening Reception for Spring Exhibitions Wed., April 25, 6-8pm

In Bloomberg Special Exhibitions Gallery

America through a Chinese Lens

April 26 – September 10, 2012

Featuring photographs and projects by:

Yan Deng, Wing Young Huie, Wayne Liu, Arthur Ou, Julie Quon, Ka-Man Tse, Tseng Kwong-Chi, Ann Woo, An Xiao, Amy Yao, Chien-An Yuan, Hai Zhang, Jiajia Zhang
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Community photographs from MOCA’s collection

America through a Chinese Lens surveys photography of American life as shot by contemporary Chinese and Chinese American artists, documentary photographers and non-professionals, identifying the specific ways in which the Chinese have used the camera to see this country – its beauty, contradictions, and realities. The exhibition spans many generations of photographers: contemporary artists who use the medium as well as snapshots taken by new immigrants from the 1950s to today which have been selected from MOCA’s permanent collection. During the run of the show, new media artist and design strategist An Xiao will be shooting and posting photographs regularly as she travels throughout the west and southwest, offering a live visual essay about her America on our tumblr page: chineseinamerica.tumblr.com.

Curated by Herb Tam, Curator and Director of Exhibitions


In the Jundy and Tin An Cheng Digital Salon

June 4, 1989: Media and Mobilization Beyond Tiananmen Square

April 26 – September 10, 2012

June 4, 1989: Media and Mobilization Beyond Tiananmen Squaredraws from MOCA’s extensive collection of Asian-American and Chinese-language periodicals to reconstruct a narrative of the coverage of and response to the Tiananmen Square protests and massacre of 1989. These periodicals tell the story of the sister movement sparked in America: thousands, mainly young Asian-Americans, marched and rallied in cities across the country in solidarity with the Chinese protesters. The crackdown of June 4 politically galvanized the Chinese-American community, and the protests escalated. Amidst the current renaissance of popular protest, June 4, 1989: Media and Mobilization Beyond Tiananmen Square offers a chance to reflect critically on the inseparable roles of protester, journalist, and spectator at home.

Curated by Ryan Wong, Assistant Curator

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A Conversation with the Artist Lee Mingwei moderated by Jane DeBevoise, Chair of Asia Art Archive

Your invitation for Feb 23 to an exhibition walk-through and conversation with artist Lee Mingwei at Museum of Chinese in America.
Copyright © 2012 Asia Art Archive in America, All rights reserved.

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Artist Talk: The Travelers with Lee Mingwei and Eugenie Tsai at the Museum of Chinese in America, NYC

Artist Talk: The Travelers with Lee Mingwei and Eugenie Tsai

Thu, Oct 27 from 6:30pm – 8pm

The Travelers & the Quartet Project is a solo exhibition of works by Taiwan-born American artist Lee Mingwei, inspired by the artist’s own itinerant early life and the stories of Chinese immigration to America. Both projects address the essential question of “where is home?” and contribute to the dialog on the legacy of Chinese in America from an artistic point of view.
Join MOCA for a conversation with Lee Mingwei and Eugenie Tsai, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

 

Click here for more information on The Travelers & the Quartet Project.

 

Admission: Free and open to the public, courtesy of TARGET. RSVP required to programs@mocanyc.org.

 

Museum of Chinese in America:

215 Centre Street, New York, NY 10013

(b/w Howard & Grand Sts; one block north of Canal St)

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