Tag Archives: New York

Predicament of Contemporary Artists: Represent or Subdue Ethnicity? by Kyunghee Pyun, Ph.D at the Korean Cultural Center, NYC

AHL Public Lecture Series 2016
in Collaboration with the Korean Cultural Center NY
 
Predicament of Contemporary Artists:
Represent or Subdue Ethnicity?
by Kyunghee Pyun, Ph.D
 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016
6:30 PM – 8:00 PM
Korean Cultural Center
460 Park Avenue (57th Street), 6th Floor
Free admission; refreshments provided
 
As contemporary art seeks a global dimension in its ambition and scale, many artists from Asia now work and live in two or three different countries. Identifying roles of race and ethnicity in contemporary art and lecture has been prominent in the past decade in related disciplines of art history, art criticism, comparative literature, and ethnic studies. In visual art as much as in film or literature, experience of growing up in an ethnic context has been represented and commented by its practitioners. In fact many critics focus on an artist’s ethnic or racial background as a cause of celebration or considers it a crucial tool to interpret his/her artistic creations. This paper aims to problematize this trend by analyzing recent exhibitions held in commercial as well as institutional art settings. While the myth of “Western Art” and its universality has been challenged and overcome, art works with strong ethnic and racial background have been promoted. One may wonder how the future would shape the current categorizing of contemporary artists by its ethnic or racial affinities.
Dr. Kyunghee Pyun is an assistant professor of history of art at Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. She has written on Asian art as well as European medieval art. Her focus of Asian art is Asian-American visual culture and reception of Asian art in Europe and North America. “Collectors of Asian Crafts in North America: Passion for Porcelain.” Journal for the Korean Society of Art and Design [Johyung Design Yeongu] (Dec. 2015) is one of many on collectors of Asian art. Her other research interests include Global trade of decorative arts in premodern Eurasia and Americas; usage and reception of visual art in context of religious performance and liturgy; interplay of word and image; and history of art collections. Her experience of teaching a diverse range of cultural exchange between Europe and Asia has become an article, “A Journey through the Silk Road in a Cosmopolitan Classroom” in Teaching Medieval and Early-Modern Cross-Cultural Encounters Across Disciplines and Eras edited by Lynn Shutters and Karina Attar (Palgrave, 2014). She was a 2015 recipient of the Field Research Grant Korea Foundation and a 2016 recipient of the SUNY Innovative Instructional Technology Grant (IITG). She is currently editing a book on dress reform in Asian in the early 20th century.
 
The AHL Foundation is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization founded in 2003 to support and promote visual artists of Korean heritage working in the United States. AHL’s diverse educational outreach programs including art history classes, museum & gallery tours, studio visits, artist talks and public lectures for the general public. For addition inquiries please contact info@ahlfoundation.org.
 
This program is funded, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the generous support from the NY Nanum Foundation.

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Khánh H. Lê: Making Memories While We Wait at Gallery d’Arte

Gallery d’Arte 548 West 28th Street, Suite 328, New York, NY 10001
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Gallery d’Arte, 548 West 28th Street, Suite 328, New York City proudly presents NARS Foundation’s fifth annual juried solo exhibition Khánh H. Lê: Making Memories While We Wait. The show will run from November 17th through December 3rd, 2016 with an Opening Reception on Thursday, November 17th from 6-8PM.

NARS Foundation is proud to present its fifth annual juried solo exhibition: Making Memories While We Wait, a show featuring the work of Khánh H. Lê. Probing his personal and familial histories in an attempt to carve out a cultural identity for himself, Vietnamese-born Lê mixes cultural signifiers with abstraction and popular culture to create new work that can be seen as either pure abstraction, identity-based art or both. Lê was selected by juror, Marshall N. Price, Nancy Hanks Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, for his series that “provides a framework for understanding how immigrant communities are part of the larger fabric of this country, yet can remain relatively invisible to the greater public.” The exhibition, generously hosted by Gallery d’Arte, in Chelsea, will open on November 17th, 6-8pm.

Lê graduated with his BFA from Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville and his MFA from Syracuse University. His work has been exhibited at the Hunterdon Art Museum (Clinton, NJ), Visual Arts at Chautauqua Institution (Chautauqua, NY), Corcoran Gallery of Art (Washington, DC), Vox Populi (Philadelphia, PA), Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts (Wilmington, DE), Arlington Arts Center (Arlington, VA), Honfleur Gallery (Washington, DC), DC Arts Center (Washington, DC), Washington Project for the Arts (Washington, DC), and Transformer (Washington, DC). The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities awarded Lê the Artist Fellowship for the Visual Arts in 2016. Lê continues to live and work in Washington, DC, where he actively explores and questions the notion of identities through the lenses of culture and memories.

New York Art Residency and Studios Foundation is a non-profit arts organization committed to supporting emerging and underrepresented artists and curators. The annual Juried Solo Exhibition Program provides visual artists who have a strong body of work with the opportunity to present their work to a wider audience. The program aims to nurture creative inspiration and foster innovative cross-pollination of ideas by presenting the most thought provoking and visually compelling artwork being produced today.

NARS programs are made possible in part through the generous support from Con Edison and with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, administrated by the Brooklyn Arts Council.

 

 

For further information


201 46th Street, 4th Floor, Brooklyn, New York 11220 
www.narsfoundation.org /info@narsfoundation.org /718-768-2765

or

Gallery d’Arte, 548 West 28th Street, Suite 328, New York, NY 10001
gallerydarte@gmail.compariskoh@gmail.com or call 917.675.7243
Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri:12-6pm Sat:12-3pm, Sun & Mon: Closed

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INVASION OF THE PODS JAMES WONG curated by MARY TING at Chinese American Arts Council, NYC

CAAC
INVASION OF THE PODS
JAMES WONG
Curated by MARY TING

PODS侵略
黄仕荣
丁維瑾策展

Chinese American Arts Council
456 Broadway, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10013

Exhibition/展期: 3.10 – 4.15.2016
Reception/茶會: 3.10.2016, 6-8pm

Exhibition Statement
James Wong, a Chinese American self taught artist has been working non-stop for the past thirty years on his Future War marker drawings. This exhibition, James Wong: Invasion of the Pods features his recent large multi panel works and the proliferation of pods– small flying ships, some that are robots, others with pilots. These works range from two feet to eight feet long in a narrative comic strip format.

With an oeuvre of some six thousand five hundred drawings to date, James Wong is immersed in his invented worlds at war. Each military force is complete with its own logo, transportation fleet, war machines, arsenal, and personnel. Intense color, bold design and minute linear details are the calling card of James’ work. Drawings are created first with a black! marker outline and templates, then followed by intense colori! ng into the wee hours. In the artwork of James Wong, the iconography of model airplanes, comic books, and architectural blue print drawings merges with game design, avatars and war technology.

Born in Hong Kong in 1972, James grew up in New York City Chinatown and went to New York’s Art and Design High School. His work has been exhibited at Cooper Union, Margaret Bodell Gallery, Henry Street Settlement, Cuchifritos and American Primitive Gallery, all in New York City.

For more information visit http://www.caacarts.org/dp/?q=/node/15&id=248

展覽論述
黄仕荣是位自学成材的美籍华裔艺术家,过去三十年一直创作一系列「未来大战」麦克笔画作。是次展览「黄仕荣:机械人侵略」展出他近期的大型多画板作品,而Pods 的增值。黄仕荣创造的Pods 是一种小飞物, 有的是机器人,有的 有飞行�‘! �。是次展览的作品长两至八呎,形式为叙述性连漫画格式。

直至现在,黄仕荣已创作了超过六千五百幅画作,沉浸于他创作的战争世界:每个军事力量都有自己的标志、车队、武器、军器厂和军人。他的画作以强烈色彩、大胆设计和细致线条见称。这些作品先以黑色麦克笔起草,再以强烈颜色上色至夜深。在黄仕荣的画作中,模型飞机、漫画和建筑蓝图的意象与游戏设计、人物造型和战争技术融合。

黄仕荣1972年生于香港,在纽约市唐人街长大,就读纽约的艺术及设计高中(Art and Design High School)。其画作曾于纽约市的库珀联盟(Cooper Union)、玛格丽特波代尔画廊(Margaret Bodell Gallery)、亨利街社福艺术中心(Henry Street Settlement),Cuchifritos画廊(Cuchifritos)和美国原始画廊(American Primitive Gallery)展出。

點選更多�³! �訊 http://www.caacarts.org/dp/?q=zh-hant%2Fnode%2F15&id=248

Chinese American Arts Council and Gallery 456 are supported, in part, by public funds from the National Endowment for the Arts; the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo & the NYS Legislature; The City of New York Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council; and many other friends.

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Curators in Conversation: Eugenie Tsai at the Museum of Chinese in America, NY

http://www.mocanyc.org/visit/events/curators_conv_eugenie_tsai

Curators in Conversation: Eugenie Tsai

Wed, Mar 9, 2016 @ 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Tickets: $12/adult; $8/senior (65+) and students (with valid ID); FREE for MOCA members

Click here to purchase tickets

Location: Museum of Chinese in America

215 Centre Street, New York, NY

MOCA presents a dynamic new program series that engages Chinese American curators, artists and cultural producers across generations and geographies in critical conversations to deeply investigate the aesthetic concerns, subject matter, and experiences within the Chinese and Asian American cultural community.

 

The series is moderated by Herb Tam, Curator and Director of Exhibitions at MOCA.

Curator Bio:

 

Eugenie Tsai joined the Brooklyn Museum in the fall of 2007 as the John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art. With Patrick Amsellem, she organized 21: Selections of Contemporary Art from the Brooklyn Museum, a long-term installation that opened on September 19, 2008. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P. S. 1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004; Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota and a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

 

Upcoming Curators in Conversation:

 

Curators in Conversation: Christopher Y. Lew

Friday, May 20, 2016 | 6:30pm

 

Curators in Conversation: Xin Wang

Tuesday, October 25, 2016 | 6:30pm

 

Curators in Conversation: Paul Chan

Thursday, November 3, 2016 | 6:30pm

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Country of Dreams: Art Festival as Social Change at Japan Society

Wednesday, April 27, 6:30 PM

Location

Japan Society
333 East 47th Street
New York, NY 10017

Abandoned buildings repurposed as surreal dream houses, a million tulip petals falling from the sky: every three years the remote snow country of Echigo-Tsumari is transformed into a spellbinding art festival. Conceived as a way of revitalizing a depopulated region, the Echigo-Tsumari Art Triennale is not only one of the world’s largest art festivals, it is a powerful force for social change. In collaboration with the local community, the bucolic landscape is turned into a multi-media exhibit space, drawing in artists and admirers from around the world. Come hear from participating artists Marina Abramović, Cai Guo-Qiang, and Ilya & Emilia Kabakov, as well as creator and General Director Fram Kitagawa. Co-organized by Midori Yamamura.

Tickets: $13/$10 Japan Society members, seniors & students

Buy tickets here

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Media as Singularities — Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai at NYU

“Media as Singularities”
Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai 
at NYU Einstein Auditorium, 34 Stuyvesant St, New York, NY 10003
Sun, March 6 at 4pm6pm.
map https://goo.gl/maps/Qmc8sz5kgZr

 
We begin with Masayuki Kawai and Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo) discussing Media as Singularities then a feedback performance by Kawai. Then, Zhen Zhang of NYU Tisch Cinema Studies and Tom Looser from East Asian Studies at NYU will join to talk about Kawai’s work.
It is open to public and free of charge.
Symposium/lecture:
USA: Tom Looser (NYU)

Zhen Zhang (NYU)
Japan: Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo)

Masayuki Kawai (video artist)
Inline image 1
Video Feedback Live Performance by Masayuki Kawai:
Masayuki Kawai builds a video feedback system composed of dozens of analog audio-visual devices. He shows the machine on site as an installation and operates it as live performance as well. Kawai’s “Video Feedback” works are made with an analog video feedback from a closed circuit system with free-flowing electronic data. No outer video/sound source is used; the video machines and circuits contain subtle noises that are amplified in the loop to generate infinite data flows. When these are put into the video input, they display various figure and colour mutations. When these are channeled into the audio input, they make sounds that are synchronized with the image. It is impossible to make these images and sounds by computer programing-simulation because the digital process eliminates the noise and gives privilege to the signals. Thus, through these works, we directly experience an organic creation of singularity with analog electronic video.

About Media as Singularities

Flush with emergencies, probabilities and preemptions, is the situation under control or out of control? Shock, noise, accident, event, etc., any such exceptional anomaly now seems to be captured by the networks to improve their flexible, robust and sustainable creativities of the self-controlling collective security against frightening unknowable aliens.
A conceptual observation of glitch, however, would provide another view; glitch, not as an error, but as a rhythm of recursive generation of a pattern, which is simultaneously singular and multiple. This paradoxical concept of glitch envisions the real and virtual power of a non-digital and in-formal logic as the potential of the technological environment. It is not simply a break cutting into a connection or opening a hole into a containment. It is not statistical digital uncertainty of unpredictable contingencies or the coming transcendental future. On the contrary, it is a sensation of immaterial materialities of the networks to metamorphose their process of auto-production. They are the conditions of the possibilities of the techno-political ecology. This rhythm is felt resonance of autonomous-and-heteronomous vibrations of the living singularities.
An ethico-aesthetic task of media as singularities is to construct a sensor for these living singularities, transducing them into the sensible as an existing alternative track: Media, the immanent future.

 

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Asian Women Giving Circle Request for Proposals 2016

Asian Women Giving Circle
Request for Proposals 2016
Women, Arts & Progressive Social Change
Deadline to Apply: Friday, March 11, 2016, 5 pm EST
Asian Women Giving Circle (AWGC) believes culture is an essential part of any strategy for social change. We support Asian American women-led organizations and individual artists in NYC who are using arts and culture to:
  • bring about progressive social transformation,
  • raise awareness and catalyze action around critical issues that affect Asian American women, girls and families, and
  • highlight and promote women’s central role as leaders, creators, developers and managers of these projects.
In this 2016 grants cycle, we anticipate that 5-8 project grants will be awarded, contingent on available funding. The maximum grant amount is $15,000.

Grantee Update

The Franklin Furnace Fund and Asian Women Giving Circle are pleased to present FIREWALL, a pop-up Internet Café and participatory art installation in New York City by Joyce Yu-Jean Lee, on view from Tuesday, February 9through Sunday, March 6, 2016 at 16B Orchard Street, New York City 10002. To learn more about the 2015 funded project, go here.
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About AWGC
Founded in 2005, the AWGC is a collaboration of Asian American women in New York City who are passionate about amplifying the transformative power of arts and culture to achieve progressive change. We promote grassroots philanthropy and pool our resources to fund projects led by Asian American women who use their creativity to move hearts and minds and inspire communities to be free of fear, bias and injustice in every form.
Like us on Facebook
Fiscally sponsored by the Ms. Foundation for Women, AWGC is a member of the Asian Americans/ Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy and the National Giving Circle Network.
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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World book launch and panel at Queens Museum of Art

http://www.queensmuseum.org/events/zhang-hongtu-expanding-visions-of-a-shrinking-world

ZH

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Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World
Book Launch and Panel Discussion

Zhang Hongtu: Expanding Visions of a Shrinking World is edited  by Luchia Meihua Lee, guest curator of Zhang Hongtu, and Jerome Silbergeld. Twelve leading art experts, art historians, and critics have reviewed the life, career, and artistic development of New York based Chinese artist Zhang Hongtu. Please join us for a conversation about the book and exhibition with Jerome Silbergeld and contributors Eugenie Tsai and Lilly Wei.

A pioneer in contemporary Chinese art, Zhang created the first example of “China Pop” art, and his oeuvre is as diverse, intellectually complex, and engaging as it is entertaining. From painting and sculpture to computer generated works and multimedia projects, Zhang’s art is equally rich in terms of China’s history and its current events, containing profound reflections on China’s oldest cultural habits and contemporary preoccupations. He provides a model of cross-cultural interaction designed to make Asian and Western audiences look more closely at each other and at themselves to recognize the beliefs they hold and the unexamined values they adhere to.

From his early work in China during the Cultural Revolution to his decades as an artist in New York, Zhang reflects the complex attitudes of a scholar-artist toward modernity, as well as toward Asian and Western societies and himself.  Placing Zhang in the context of his cultural milieu both in China and in the Chinese immigrant artist community in America, this volume’s contributors examine his adaptations of classic art to reflect a contemporary sensibility, his relation to Cubism and Social Realism, his collaboration with the celebrated fashion designer Vivienne Tam, and his visual critique of China’s current environmental crisis.

Jerome Silbergeld is the P. Y. and Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History at Princeton University and director of Princeton’s Tang Center for East Asian Art. A specialist in Song-Yuan period painting, he has published more than eighty books, catalogues, articles, and book chapters on topics in traditional and contemporary Chinese painting, traditional architecture and gardens, cinema and photography. He has also curated and co-curated eight exhibitions, including the first major solo exhibition in America by a Chinese artist, in 1988. His books on cinema and photography include China Into Film, Hitchcock with a Chinese Face, and Humanism in China. On contemporary art, his books includeContradictions: Artistic Life, the Socialist State, and the Chinese Painter Li Huasheng, the first extensive study of any PRC artist, which became a New York Times notable book of the year in 1993; Outside In, on the globalization and loss of “Chineseness” of Chinese art; and ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art.

Eugenie Tsai has been John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum since 2007. Previously she was Director of Curatorial Affairs at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center in Queens, New York. Prior to Joining P.S.1 in 2005, she was an independent curator with projects for the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Berkeley Museum; and the Princeton University Art Museum. She held several positions at the Whitney Museum of American Art prior to becoming Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs. Among the exhibitions and installations she has organized are the mid-career survey Threshold: Byron Kim, 1990-2004Robert Smithson, which received the International Association of Art Critics’ first place award for the best monographic exhibition of 2005; and for Princeton University, Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Dr. Tsai received a B.A. from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University

Lilly Wei is a New York-based independent curator and critic whose focus is global contemporary art. She has written regularly for Art in America since 1984 and is a contributing editor at ARTnews and  formerly one at Art Asia Pacific.  Among other national and international publications, Wei has also written for Art & Australia, Asian Art News, Sanat Dünyamiz, Art Papers, Sculpture Magazine, Studio International, Tema Celeste, Flash Art, Art Press, and Art and Auction, and has frequently reported on international biennials such as those of Venice, Sydney, Cairo, Athens, Reykjavik, Shenzhen and Hong Kong and international exhibitions such as Documenta and Sonsbeek, the sculpture international in the Netherlands.  She has been the author of many exhibition catalogues and brochures on contemporary art, including publications for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, NY; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Knoedler, Marlborough and Pace Galleries, New York, NY. She has curated numerous exhibitions in the United States, Europe and Asia. Two of her most recent exhibitions were “The Museum Imagined” at Danese/Corey, New York, NY, and “Uncanny/Figure” at Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Programs.  Wei lectures on critical and curatorial practices and serves on numerous advisory committees and review panels.  She was born in Chengdu, China and has an MA in art history from Columbia University, New York.

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Cui Fei: The Journey of Transformation at the West 10th Window Project

Cui Fei: The Journey of Transformation
December 18, 2015 – January 29, 2016
West 10th Window Project
Time Equities Art-in-Buildings Projects

223-225 West 10th at Bleecker St, New York, NY
image

Time Equities Inc. Art-in-Buildings is pleased to announce the newest exhibition at the West 10th Window: Cui Fei, The Journey of Transformation.

Cui Fei’s The Journey of Transformation historicizes the natural world, presenting found pieces of driftwood as though they are artifacts from an archaeological dig displayed in a museum vitrine. By presenting objects that are beaten down, weathered, and discarded as elevated symbols of cultural heritage, Cui reveals a disconnect between the value we place on material objects and the value we place on our environment. Through her meticulous arrangement of the driftwood, Cui elevates the natural to the same level of preciousness assigned to the luxury items displayed in high-end boutique windows up the street. In this context, Cui imbues these otherwise overlooked pieces of driftwood with cultural importance and value.

More than referencing a museum vitrine, Cui’s display organizes the driftwood into a concise format, providing structure to objects that float freely in the natural world – ‘drifting’ implies an uncontrolled movement driven by chance and destiny. Cui explains that while in the West there is an attempt to control the environment through scientific understanding, ancient Chinese philosophies on nature recognize humanity as a part of the natural world, as opposed to a force able to control it. The driftwood mimics this philosophy as a representation of what can or cannot be controlled, while Cui’s precise arrangement realizes the Western desire to instill order onto nature.

Cui Fei was born in Jinan, China. She received her MFA in painting at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and received her BFA degree from the China Academy of Fine Arts. Cui’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at venues such as the Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY; Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ; Museum of Chinese in American, NY; Queens Museum of Art, Queens, NY; Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, CT; Wave Hill, Bronx, NY; Bronx Museum of Arts; Kunstgewerbe Museum, Dresden, Germany; Jeju Museum of Art, Korea, Jeju, Korea, Rietberg Museum Zurich, Switzerland; Warehouse Gallery at Syracuse University, among others.

She is a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, the Artist’s Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Art, Emerging Artist Fellowship from Socrates Sculpture Park, SIP fellowship from the Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop, and the Artist-in-residence Workspace grant from The Center for Book Arts.

Special thanks to Mansheng Wang and Chloe Wang for contributing the driftwood collected at Dobbs Ferry.

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