Tag Archives: video

Media as Singularities — Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai at NYU

“Media as Singularities”
Symposium and video feedback performance by Masayuki Kawai 
at NYU Einstein Auditorium, 34 Stuyvesant St, New York, NY 10003
Sun, March 6 at 4pm6pm.
map https://goo.gl/maps/Qmc8sz5kgZr

 
We begin with Masayuki Kawai and Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo) discussing Media as Singularities then a feedback performance by Kawai. Then, Zhen Zhang of NYU Tisch Cinema Studies and Tom Looser from East Asian Studies at NYU will join to talk about Kawai’s work.
It is open to public and free of charge.
Symposium/lecture:
USA: Tom Looser (NYU)

Zhen Zhang (NYU)
Japan: Daisuke Harashima (University of Tokyo)

Masayuki Kawai (video artist)
Inline image 1
Video Feedback Live Performance by Masayuki Kawai:
Masayuki Kawai builds a video feedback system composed of dozens of analog audio-visual devices. He shows the machine on site as an installation and operates it as live performance as well. Kawai’s “Video Feedback” works are made with an analog video feedback from a closed circuit system with free-flowing electronic data. No outer video/sound source is used; the video machines and circuits contain subtle noises that are amplified in the loop to generate infinite data flows. When these are put into the video input, they display various figure and colour mutations. When these are channeled into the audio input, they make sounds that are synchronized with the image. It is impossible to make these images and sounds by computer programing-simulation because the digital process eliminates the noise and gives privilege to the signals. Thus, through these works, we directly experience an organic creation of singularity with analog electronic video.

About Media as Singularities

Flush with emergencies, probabilities and preemptions, is the situation under control or out of control? Shock, noise, accident, event, etc., any such exceptional anomaly now seems to be captured by the networks to improve their flexible, robust and sustainable creativities of the self-controlling collective security against frightening unknowable aliens.
A conceptual observation of glitch, however, would provide another view; glitch, not as an error, but as a rhythm of recursive generation of a pattern, which is simultaneously singular and multiple. This paradoxical concept of glitch envisions the real and virtual power of a non-digital and in-formal logic as the potential of the technological environment. It is not simply a break cutting into a connection or opening a hole into a containment. It is not statistical digital uncertainty of unpredictable contingencies or the coming transcendental future. On the contrary, it is a sensation of immaterial materialities of the networks to metamorphose their process of auto-production. They are the conditions of the possibilities of the techno-political ecology. This rhythm is felt resonance of autonomous-and-heteronomous vibrations of the living singularities.
An ethico-aesthetic task of media as singularities is to construct a sensor for these living singularities, transducing them into the sensible as an existing alternative track: Media, the immanent future.

 

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Jakkai Siributr — Transient Shelter — April 17 – May 31, 2014, Tyler Rollins Fine Art, NYC

Tyler Rollins Fine Art

 

JAKKAI SIRIBUTR
TRANSIENT SHELTER
APRIL 17 – MAY 31, 2014

Rollins Fine Art is pleased to present Transient Shelter, an exhibition of new works by Jakkai Siributr, taking place at our gallery in New York City from April 17 – May 31, 2014. The public is cordially invited to the opening reception on Thursday, April 17, from6:00 to 8:00 pm. The artist will be in attendance.

Jakkai has long been known as one of Thailand’s leading artists working with textiles, producing meticulously handmade tapestry and installation works that make powerful statements about religious, social, and political issues in contemporary Thailand. A main preoccupation of his art is the interaction between Buddhism and materialism in modern life, and the everyday popular culture of Thailand. In recent years, he has incorporated other materials and media in his work, including industrial and found materials, sound, and video. For Transient Shelter, Jakkai has produced a series of self-portrait photographs that have him “embodying” the elaborately embroidered and ornamented uniforms that are also part of the exhibition, along with a video work.

The exhibition is a meditation on the transience of worldly success and the way the trappings of social status are often imbued with quasi-mystical associations that maintain a link with animistic beliefs. With the photographs, Jakkai adopts poses taken from portraits of his ancestors, many of whom served as royal courtiers and in some cases had their lives cut short by the sometimes tragic vicissitudes of Thai political history. Wearing Thai civil service uniforms decked out with awards, he evokes the type of formal portrait photographs that are included in the funeral books that Thai families compile to commemorate the lives of relatives, and that typically emphasize the deceased person’s social status. Jakkai has encrusted the actual uniforms with elaborate ornaments that are inspired by Buddhist amulets and animist talismans, hinting at the deep-seated beliefs that underlie current social conventions. With some of the portraits, Jakkai poses in front of dilapidated backgrounds, pointing to the process of decay and rebirth that alludes to the cycle of life and death, as well as perhaps the state of social breakdown in today’s fractious Thailand. The exhibition title itself suggests that social status, like everything else in life, is but a transitory phase. This sense is heighted by the short video work, in which a uniform jacket slowly moves under flowing water, accompanied by a soundtrack of a burning funeral pyre.

Transient Shelter is curated by Singapore-based researcher, curator and critic Iola Lenzi, who writes in the catalogue essay: “mining local icons of religion and entrenched cultural tradition, Jakkai produces an art of thoughtful resistance that allusively takes aim at meaningless hierarchies, ineffective systems, and empty gestures masquerading as consequential. In its questioning of overlapping fiction and truth, dance with image and reality, and to-and-fro between life and death, Transient Shelter, though starting with ideas rooted in Thai culture, speaks to a universal audience.”

Born in 1969 in Bangkok, Thailand, where he currently lives and works, Jakkai received his formal training in the United States, earning a BA in textile and fine arts at Indiana University (1992) and an MS in printed textile design at Philadelphia University (1996). His work has been shown in a number of museums around the world in recent years. In the United Sates, his work was included in Phantoms of Asia: Contemporary Awakens the Past at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (2012), as well as the museum’sHere / Not Here: Buddha Presence in Eight Recent Works (2011). As part of the latter exhibition, Jakkai presented his interactive Reciprocity project in the Asian Art Museum’s Tateuchi Gallery; his work Recession (2010) subsequently entered the museum’s collection. In 2009, Jakkai’s Lucky Ware installation (2008) was featured at the Rubin Museum in New York City, and he was included in Truly Truthful in Miami. He has presented two solo exhibitions at Tyler Rollins Fine Art: Temple Fair (2008) and Karma Cash & Carry (2010). In Asia, Jakkai’s Shroud installation was recently featured in the exhibition, Exploring the Cosmos: The Stupa as a Buddhist Symbol (2012 – 2013) at Singapore’s Asian Civilisations Museum, which acquired the work for its permanent collection. In 2011, he presented a major exhibition of installations, sculptural works, and embroidered tapestries at the Art Center, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand (2011). He was a featured artist in the 2011 Chongqing Biennial and in the 2009 Asian Art Biennial at the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts, which acquired his work,Suffrage (2008). Other important collections of his work include the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Seattle, and the Vehbi Koç Foundation, Istanbul.

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Lorin Chow Roser -SOUNDS, VIDEO– Russell Leong -Poems

“Yellow Soul Brothers”

Lorin Chow Roser -SOUNDS, VIDEO– Russell Leong  -Poems 

at  REVIVAL  Café

129 East 15th St.  —-   between  Irving Pl -. 3rd Ave. — Gramercy

March 3  Monday   8 pm   —   $3 donation/   curated  by   Supolo

FUSION  SOUND JAM (Sanjshin Blues, BoBo’s Song)    and

   POEMS (5 Worlds, Buzz and Snip, Tong Zhi Body)

Lorin Roser ––is a multimedia artist, composer and animator whose work has the expression of mathematics utilizes algorithms in his compositions and physical simulations in his 3D architectural  animations exhibited at Plum Blossoms, Crossing Art, Flushing Town Hall.  His  recent music is created with realtime manipulation of polynomials began  years ago..His  animated video and painting series called Mythical Montage, are a “unique interplay…evoking new cyber forms that are montage into an abstracted mental way.  As a musician, Roser has performed at CBGB’s, Emily Harvey Foundation with Larry Litt, White Box with Elliott Sharp, events for curator/performance artist A. Schloss at Remote and Puffin Room. His architecture works into his drawn sounds as well. www.lorinroser. raw city.net delete spaces. www.cloudspace.com  search– strange attraction

Russell Leong– Poet -Writer, editor and professor for years at the University of California, Los Angeles. Currently Visiting Professor at AARI_ CUNY College, Editor-in-Chief, Amerasia Journal. Edited scholarly anthologies; his own fiction received national awards including the American Book Award in fiction, and the PEN Josephine Miles Award for poetry. see wiki page

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Love of Sun [www.loveofsun.org], a multimedia exhibit curated by Rachel Kennedy and produced by Moholy Ground Project

“Love of Sun”

Online-Only Multimedia Exhibit Depicts California Artists’ Visions of China — and Chinese Artists’ Visions of California

Love of Sun [www.loveofsun.org], a multimedia exhibit curated by Rachel Kennedy and produced by Moholy Ground Project, officially went live for an exclusive online-only exhibit from now to January 4, 2014. The site showcases photographs and videos by a variety of artists based in China and California, each depicting their unique vision of the opposite region. Works by Chinese artists includes Aphasia Li Chen’s powerful, Chris Marker-influenced film shot during her time with the Occupy Movement in the Bay Area, and Chen Zhou’s lonely, whimsical Superman-California Dreaming, beautifully shot with an iPhone 5, which evokes cross-cultural cosplay and social media. Works by California artists include Rian Dundan’s Fan, a sad, insightful photo series depicting (and deglamorizing) the off-screen life of Chinese superstar Fan Bing Bing, shot during Dundon’s time as the actress’ English tutor while she prepared for a role in Iron Man 3.

Named after a track of the same name by Beijing-based indie band The Ruins, Love of Sun highlights works which critically examine cultural, political, economic, and aesthetic influences between contemporary California and China. “The potential for cross-pollination between artists working in urban China and California deserves deep investigation,” explains Kennedy. “Economic and political relations between China and the US are at a historic high, and in the US, especially in technology and entertainment, California is the locus of this cultural exchange.” The decision to debut Love of Sun as an online installation also reflects how much this interaction between the two regions is largely mediated by the Internet.

After its end date, Love of Sun will transition to showings at gallery locations in California and China.

Love of Sun’s Featured Artists and Works

● Chen Zhou – “Superman/California Dreaming” (described above). View here: http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Chen_Zhou.html

● Rian Dundon – “fan” (described above). View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Dundon_Rian.html

● Li “Lillian” Chen – “aphasia” (described above). View
here: http://loveofsun.org/LOS_Chen_li.html

● Duo Peng – “Outsider”, a docu-photo series of San Francisco’s Chinatown inhabitants, who live in “a separate space” between the US and modern China. View here: http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Peng_Duo.html

● Chen Zhang – “Surface Read”, a series exploring China’s “post-1980s children” culture through conceptual photos. View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Zhang_Chen.html

● Calvin Lee – “Rancho Rodeo de la Aguas”, a series of photos of luxury products produced in China and displayed on Rodeo Drive. View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Lee_Calvin.html

● Jeannie Sims – “Readymaids” a photo series offering a glimpse at the Indonesian women destined to work in the McMansions of China’s newly wealthy. View here:
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Simms_Jeannie.html

● Alice Tuan – “Shanghailand”, a photo-essay on everyday life in today’s Shanghai. View here: http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Tuan_Umbrellas_Shanghai.html
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Tuan_Fuxing_Park.html
http://www.loveofsun.org/LOS_Tuan_Shopgirl.html

About the Creator/Curator and Publisher:

Rachel Kennedy is editor-in-chief of Moholy Ground and currently an MA candidate at California Institute of the Arts’ Aesthetics and Politics program.

Moholy Ground (moholyground.org) is a San Francisco-based non-profit founded and directed by John McCoy.

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