Projects

Climate Working Group

Photo by Karen Holmberg.

The Climate Working Group is a group of researchers, scholars, artists, activists, and organizations working to bridge the science, arts, humanities, and policy through collaborative projects for the public on our climate crisis.


The Wayfinding Project

The Wayfinding Project

Inspired by the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Lenape peoples, The Wayfinding Project is initiated by John Kuo Wei Tchen and the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU, in collaboration with artist Beatrice Glow, to promote curiosity, research, and decolonize New York’s history.  The project, consisting of an installation, series of programs, and a laboratory, launches in Spring 2016 and heeds this ancient wayfinding practice for environmental, cultural, and philosophical stewardship, towards exploring and documenting Lenape knowledge of Mannahatta, the pre-seventeenth century New York brimming with a diverse and dense geo-culture of land and waters.

Haunted Files

Haunted Files

Drawing from primary source material, Haunted Files: The Eugenics Record Office reimagines the Eugenics Record Office, transporting visitors to the epicenter of American eugenics research and propaganda. A project of the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU, Haunted Files is a multi-part exhibition and online space that explores how anti-Asian policies and legislation set the groundwork for the “scientific racism” of modern American politics. Bringing the “relics” of eugenics out of the buried archives, it confronts us with the legacy that continues to trouble today’s national conversations about race, immigration, intelligence, norms, and belonging.

NYU Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange

NYU Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange

The Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU launched the first phase of the inter-institutional NYU Global Asia/Pacific Art Exchange in July 2013 in Shanghai, China; Hong Kong; and Wollongong, Sydney, and Canberra, Australia, focusing on Asian/Asian diasporic art globally.

The exchange brought together scholars, curators, and artists from each site and was generative for research, resulting in publications, exhibition development, and other research-based projects. The exchange continues to strengthen international networks of scholars and curators, and create ongoing dialogue between international colleagues, arts communities, and wider publics in the US, Asia/Pacific region, EU, Latin America, Africa, and Middle East in the expanding field of Asian/Asian Diasporic Art and Visual Cultures.

Through international site visits, symposia, public dialogues, and ongoing working sessions, the exchange aims to build sustained multi-year inter-institutional and scholarly connections to encourage a broader transnational and comparative diasporic discourse while recognizing the continual importance of local contextualization and place. In 2014, the exchange traveled to Washington, DC and New York City. In 2015, the exchange traveled to Japan and Hawai’i. Future phases of the exchange are planned for Indonesia, India, United Kingdom, Argentina, and Ghana.


The Asian/Pacific American Documentary Heritage Archives Survey

The Asian/Pacific American Documentary Heritage Archives Survey

The Asian/Pacific American Documentary Heritage Archives Survey is the first systematic attempt to map existing and potential Asian/Pacific American archival collections in the New York metropolitan area. The project seeks to address the underrepresentation of East Coast Asian America in historic scholarship and archives by surveying the collections of community-based organizations and individuals. The project’s database serves as a central resource for learning about and accessing these collections, which have been surveyed by A/P/A’s Graduate Archives Scholars. This project is a collaboration between A/P/A and Tamiment Library & Robert F. Wagner Archives at New York University. It was generously funded from 2008-2011 by the Metropolitan New York Library Council.


Radical Archives

Radical Archives

Radical Archives was a two-day conference (April 11-12, 2014) organized around the notion of archiving as a radical practice, including: archives of radical politics and practices; archives that are radical in form or function; moments or contexts in which archiving in itself becomes a radical act; and considerations of how archives can be active in the present, as well as documents of the past and scripts for the future. It was curated by 2013-14 A/P/A Institute Artists-in-ResidenceMariam Ghani and Chitra Ganesh.

The conference was organized around four threads of radical archival practice: Archive and Affect, or the embodied archive; Archiving Around Absence, or reading for the shadows; Archives and Ethics, or stealing from and for archives; and Archive as Constellation, or archive as method, medium, and interface.

Resources from the conference are available here.


Diasporic Asian Art Network (DAAN)

Diasporic Asian Art Network (DAAN)

Diasporic Asian Art Network (DAAN) is a network of scholars, artists, curators, arts writers, and graduate students interested in Asian American art and art history.

The purpose of this proposed network is to share ideas and information, both about our own projects and about the work of others in the United States and abroad, toward advancing new research, critical writing, and curatorial efforts involving modern and contemporary Asian American/Asian diasporic art and visual culture.

The “Diasporic Asian Art Network” (DAAN) hopes to encourage a broader transnational and trans-diasporic as well as domestic orientation. Whereas ‘Asian American’ does refer specifically to the American, read US experience, the network situates within the Asian diaspora, bringing the discussion to a global level that includes Asian American art. In our view, the American situation can only be invigorated and enriched by working with other Asian diasporas.


International Network for Diasporic Asian Art Research (INDAAR)

International Network for Diasporic Asian Art Research (INDAAR)

Art by artists of Asian descent in countries such as Australia, Britain, Canada and the United States is a significant cultural production, both in historical and contemporary terms. INDAAR offers a context to internationalize research on diasporic Asian art in these countries and others. INDAAR is an international network for researchers interested in comparative and transnational studies of diasporic Asian art. The network facilitates opportunities for initiating transnational dialogues and generating collaborative research projects.

This network is a special project of the Asian Australian Studies Research Network (AASRN) and established in association with the Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Project entitled “Being Asian in Australia and the United States.”

INDAAR is also supported by the School of Communications and Arts, Edith Cowan University, Australia. A/P/A Institute at NYU is an institutional partner of INDAAR.


Re-envisioning American Art History: Asian American Art, Research, and Teaching

Re-envisioning American Art History: Asian American Art, Research, and Teaching

The Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University convened a NEH Summer Institute from July 9-28, 2012 entitled, “Re-envisioning American Art History: Asian American Art, Research, and Teaching.” The Summer Institute for twenty-five college and university teachers deepened participants’ understanding of pivotal developments and critical issues in Asian American art history and visual culture studies, while concurrently providing access to specialized archives that will enhance their research and teaching in the humanities.