New York Coalition for Asian American Mental Health Records

Date Range: 19932010
Survey Conducted: Tue, 2010-03-16
Creator: New York Coalition for Asian American Mental Health Records

History: The New York Coalition for Asian American Mental Health (NYCAAMH) is a not-for-profit 501 (c) (3) organization founded in 1989 by a group of concerned individuals including health and mental health professionals and organizations. Our mission is to improve the quality of mental health services for Asian Americans in the New York City metropolitan area. The Coalition offers mental health educational workshops and training, and a forum for mental health service providers and concerned individuals to network, share resources, and collaborate on culturally competent models of treatment for Asian Americans. Read more

New York Bureau of Legal Advice Records

Date Range: 19171919
Survey Conducted: Tue, 2011-04-26
Creator: New York Bureau of Legal Advice

History: Originating as the New York Bureau of Legal First aid and lead by attorney Charles Recht and feminist Frances M. Witherspoon, the organization was started with a grant the Women’s Peace Party in 1917. Along with individuals, organizations like the People’s Council, the Socialist Party, the civil Liberties Bureau and the Workmen’s Council all provided sponsorship (although the People’s Council and the Civil Liberties Bureau soon withdrew support). Responding to the need created by conflict with new laws related to World War I, the New York Bureau of Legal First Aid was the first organization to provide free legal advice and counsel to draft resisters, conscientious objectors, deserters and others who suffered infringements of their First Amendment Rights.

New York Asian Women’s Center Records

Date Range: 19822009
Survey Conducted: Wed, 2009-12-09
Creator: New York Asian Women’s Center

History: One of the first organizations in the United States to address the linguistic, social, and economic barriers that prevent many Asian immigrant women from accessing domestic violence services, the New York Asian Women’s Center (NYAWC) aims to empower Asian women to experience their lives free from violence. Founded in 1982 by a group of volunteers led by Pat Eng, NYAWC began as community awareness project to educate communities in Chinatown about domestic violence issues. Recognizing the need for an advocacy organization that engaged in direct service, NYAWC set up a single-line, volunteer-run emergency hotline for abused women seeking help. Today, the emergency hotline (1-888-888-7702) operates 24-hours a day/seven days a week, provides services in 15 different languages and dialects including Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Bengali, and receives over 3,000 calls each year. Read more

MinKwon Center for Community Action Records, The

Date Range: 19842010
Survey Conducted: Tue, 2010-11-16
Creator: MinKwon Center for Community Action, The
History: The MinKwon Center for Community Action is a grassroots, community-action non-profit organization based in Flushing, New York, serving the Korean and Asian American communities. MinKwon, which means “civil rights” in Korean, engages in advocacy and community organizing, provides social services, encourages civic participation, fosters youth empowerment, and supports cultural expression among the Korean community in New York City. Read more

Brooks McNamara Papers

Date Range: 18961997
Survey Conducted: Thu, 2009-10-01
Creator: McNamara, Brooks

History: Brooks McNamara began teaching at New York University’s Graduate Drama Department in 1968 and was instrumental in its transformation into the Performance Studies Department in 1980. He founded the Shubert Archives preserving the artistic and business records of the Shubert Brothers Sam, Lee and J.J. in 1976 and served as its Director for 20 years. McNamara’s research, writing, and curatorial pursuits resulted in numerous publications, exhibitions, productions, and archival collections. His life’s work spanned the fields of theatre history, popular entertainments, public celebrations, and New York performance history. After retiring in 1996, McNamara remained Professor Emeritus of Performance Studies and Director Emeritus of the Shubert Archive. He died in May 2009.

Jay Leyda and Si-Lan Chen Leyda Papers

Date Range: 19131987
Survey Conducted: Mon, 2008-10-27
Creator: Leyday, Jay; Leyday, Si-Lan Chen

History: Si-Lan Chen was a dancer, choreographer and actor who pioneered the use of Chinese dance elements in modern dance and films such as “Anna and the King of Siam” (1946) and “The Keys to the Kingdom” (1944). Chen was born in Trinidad in 1905 to parents of African and Chinese descent. In 1912, she moved to London, where she studied dance at the Stedman Academy. In 1926 she moved to China to join her father, who had become secretary for Sun Yat-sen as well as Foreign Minister of the Canton government. However, after Chiang Kai-shek took power in 1927, the family fled to Moscow, where Chen enrolled in the Bolshoi Ballet School. She soon switched to Vera Maya’s school, finding Maya’s approach, which included both traditional ballet and more loosely organized “plastic dance,” more suitable to her own style. Chen gave her first important recital in 1930 at the Moscow Conservatory. Shortly after, she was widely recognized as the first modern Soviet dancer.

Robert Lee and Eleanor Yung Papers, Asian American Arts Centre Collection

Date Range: 19682001
Survey Conducted: Tue, 2011-01-25
Creator: Lee, Robert (b.1944) and Yung, Eleanor (b.1946); Asian American Arts Centre

History: Partners Robert Lee, an author and curator, and Eleanor Yung, a choreographer and acupuncturist, were both involved in establishing the Asian American Arts Centre (AAAC). In addition to the AAAC, Lee and Yung have held leadership roles in national and New York City-based Asian American cultural and political organizations, dedicating their careers to supporting Asian American artists and their work. Read more

Charles Lai and Patricia Eng, East Coast Asian Student Union Collection

Date Range: 19781987
Survey Conducted: Mon, 2010-05-17
Creator: Lai, Charles and Eng, Patricia; East Coast Asian Student Union

History: Charles Lai was a founding member of the East Coast Asian Student Union (ECASU), a network of Asian American student groups based at east coast colleges and universities. Presently known as the East Coast Asian American Student Union (ECAASU), ECASU formed at the Asian Student Unity conference held at Princeton University in 1978. Though it was established in the late 1970s, the organization claims roots in the protest movements of the 1960s – when the Civil Rights Movement and anti-Vietnam War protests inspired Asian Americans on campuses across the country to engage in political action. In its early years, ECASU promoted student activism among Asian Americans on various campuses. In addition, ECASU organized social and cultural events, worked to establish “Asian in America History Week,” and hosted College Days (college application informational and financial aid sessions) for high school students. Read more

Yoshio Kishi/ Irene Yah Ling Sun Collection

charliechanDate Range: 17002005
Survey Conducted: Wed, 2008-10-01
Creator: Kishi, Yoshio (1932-2012)

History: Yoshio Kishi (1932-2012) is an award-winning New York City-based film and sound editor whose credits include such classics as Jerry Schatzberg’s “Panic in Needle Park” (1971), Alan Parker’s “Fame” (1980), Martin Scorcese’s “Raging Bull” (1980), and Wayne Wang’s “Dim Sum” (1985). For four decades, Kishi has been an avid collector of materials that trace the depiction of Asian Americans in U.S. intellectual and popular culture and of materials produced by Asian American activists to counter such stereotypical images. His compulsion for collecting Asian Americana began in the mid-1960s when, in the midst of thinking about his identity, he began to regret not knowing more about his ethnic heritage.

Leo Hershkowitz Collection

Date Range: 17001950
Survey Conducted: Thu, 2008-11-13
Creator: Hershkowitz, Leo

History:
 The Leo Hershkowitz Collection was created by Leo Hershkowitz, a New York City historian, who collected the materials from various sources. Hershkowitz is a long-time professor at Queens College and a recognized expert on New York Jewish history from its earliest origins up to the period before the mass migrations of the 19th century. The collection represents a lifetime of scholarship and collecting.

Summary: The collection consists largely of primary documents from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries relating to the social history of New York City. Of particular significance are materials which document popular attitudes and contain depictions of Asians and Asian Americans. These include five copies of Secret Service, a dime novel series, are set in New York City in the early part of the century. They include issues such as “The Brady’s Chinese Trail; or, the Hunt for the Wooden Idol” and “The Bradys and Hop Toy; or Working for the Mayor of Chinatown.” Also included are illustrations from Harper’s Weekly and Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper which depict Chinese and Japanese American life and work in New York City and San Francisco. There are also illustrations which depict a ball in honor of the visit of the Japanese Embassy in June 1860, as well as scenes in Japan and China. A total of fifteen pages, ranging in date from 1860 to 1900, are present.

Total Size: 210 linear feet
APA-related Size: 1 linear foot
Arrangement: other
Location: Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive, New York University
Bibliographic Control: inventory
Conditions Governing Access: Contact repository for detailed information on conditions governing access.