United Automobile Workers of America, District 65 Photographs

Basebll Protest

Date Range: 19381969
Survey Conducted: Fri, 2011-05-20
Creator: United Automobile Workers of America, District 65

History: District Council 65 of the United Automobile Workers (UAW) began as a group of Jewish laborers working in dry goods warehouses in the Lower East Side of New York City. The union became a local of the Wholesale Dry Goods Employees Union in 1935 before affiliating with the Distributive Trades Council of New York and the Retail Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU). Its affiliation with the UAW began in 1979. In later years, the union’s membership grew beyond the warehouse and retail workers to include white-collar workers in publishing and universities. The union remained active until bankruptcy forced the union to close in 1994. Read more

Chinese-American Labor and Immigration Collection

Date Range: 19701990
Survey Conducted: Thu, 2008-12-04
Creator: Robert F. Wagner Labor Archive

History: The Chinese-American Labor and Immigration Collection was given to the Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives in the late 1980s.

Summary: The collection consists of subject files; which include clippings, printed material and correspondence; relating to immigration, labor, women’s issues, Asian student organizations, and health services. A small number of files contain minutes and other administrative materials from the Asian Labor Resource Center, including materials relating to the First and Second Asian Labor Conferences at Cornell University (1988-1989).

Total Size: 2 linear feet
APA-related Size: 2 linear feet
Languages of materials: Chinese and English
Arrangement: other
Location: Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University
Bibliographic Control: other
Collection Link: http://dlib.nyu.edu/findingaids/html/tamwag/wag_126/
Conditions Governing Access: Contact repository for detailed information on conditions governing access.
Preservation Note: The collection contains many clippings and other publications which are highly acidic and should be appropriately rehoused or reformatted.

Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA) Records


Date Range:
 19922011
Survey Conducted: Wed, 2011-05-11
Creator: Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA)

History:
 Dedicated to the needs and concerns of Asian Pacific American (APA) workers the foundations for the creation of the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA) were laid in 1990 when a number of APA labor activists presented the AFL-CIO with a proposal to better address a continued under-representation among APA workers in the labor movement by forming a national APA labor organization. Following the lessons learned from the examples of APA labor leaders in history, they understood the necessity of forming labor alliances, and sought to get more APA workers into unions, especially, those working in historically important industries such as garment factories and restaurants.The founders recognized that, in addition to traditional issues like fair wages, health care, and dignity, APA workers faced other challenges and workplace discrimination. Despite the popularity of a ‘model minority myth’ about Asian Pacific Americans, there are many misunderstandings about the ability of many Asian Pacific Americans to achieve economic security and prosperity. While the median income of APA workers is higher than the national average, there is tremendous difference between specific ethnic groups – some experience high rates of poverty and others have incomes that are substantially loser than the national average. Other disadvantages related to immigration status, discrimination, language ability and education force many Asian Pacific Americans into low-paying and insecure jobs, often accompanied by exploitation, discrimination and harsh conditions.

AFL-CIO New York City Central Labor Council Records

Date Range: 19332005
Survey conducted: Thu, 2008-12-04
Creator: AFL-CIO New York City Central Labor Council Records

History:
 Formed in 1959 from a merger of the American Federation of Labor-affiliated Central Trades and Labor Council and the New York City Congress of Industrial Organizations, The New York City Central Labor Council is an organization comprised of nearly 400 local union affiliates. According to its constitution, its purpose is to further the rights of workers to organize in unions and bargain collectively; to advocate legislation which is beneficial to workers and oppose that which is not; to correct abuses and to insure the workers their just rights. It also has the broader purposes of helping all workers to improve their working conditions and raise their standard of living; to preserve workers’ rights to act together for mutual aid and advancement; to further the cause of trade unions; and to strengthen civil rights. It acts as the central body of the City’s labor movement, providing assistance and education through its various committees and councils. The regular activities of the New York City Central Labor Council are directed by its executive officers, Executive Board, and Delegates’ Council meetings. The planning and execution of programs and conferences is the province of a number of standing and special committees. These committees are composed of members from affiliated local unions, and each has its own officers and advisory staff and is responsible for conducting specific programs and conferences.
Read more

AFL-CIO Printed Ephemera Collection

Date Range: 19492007
Survey Conducted: Fri, 2011-04-08
Creator: AFL-CIO

History:
 The AFL-CIO was created from the merger of two major labor organizations. The American Federation of Labor (AFL), a craft-oriented union, had been formed in 1886, while the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) had broken away from the AFL in the late 1930s after internal disputes. The two unions merged in 1955 and George Meany was elected as the first president of the new AFL-CIO. Meany was succeeded in 1979 by Lane Kirkland.Because it is a voluntary federation of labor unions, the AFL-CIO represents nearly all unionized employees in the U.S. and Canada. Member unions are permitted proportional representation by delegates with voting power. The AFL-CIO lobbies on behalf of unionized labor and steps in as a mediator when member unions are in conflict.

Sources:
 The Tamiment Library & Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives. “Guide to the AFL-CIO Printed Ephemera Collection.” Last accessed April , 29, 2011. http://dlib.nyu.edu/findingaids/html/tamwag/pe_aflcio.html.